Where Corruption is Total

Defenders of the status quo in the intelligence world are beginning to sound an awful lot like Uncle Andrew from The Magician’s Nephew.

“No, Digory. Men like me, who possess hidden wisdom, are freed from common rules just as we are cut off from common pleasures. Ours, my boy, is a high and lonely destiny.”

So I would like to make a few observations about that high and lonely destiny, and in my view these observations stand, whether or not “sources and methods” are being revealed, whether or not Julian Assange is a dirt bag, and whether or not Trump’s war with the deep state is going to be at all successful.

One way or another, these leaks and revelations have shown that the people currently running the show behind the scenes are not up to the task. If you have a conservative view of the nature of man, and the subsequent need for checks and balances and constitutional law, then you will not have a “high and lonely destiny” chair to fill. But if you did, you would not fill it with these people.

The most sanguine outlook is that we are looking at gross incompetence. These security breaches are not simply things that just “happen.” Somebody was asleep at the switch. When an armored car is robbed, one of the things you need to do is review what the guards were doing at the time. What was Private Manning, future girl, doing with access to all those secrets? What was Snowden, a contractor, doing with access to all those secrets? And with regard to this latest dump, what was—let us guess—the cleaning lady doing with them?

Listening to defenders of the intelligence community on television is like listening to the favorite aunt of the Brinks armored car driver, complaining that the dastardly criminals are revealing to the world certain trade secrets—sources and methods— like when the guards and drivers take their naps. This puts us all in peril.

Just curious. How many people in the intelligence community have lost their jobs over these security breaches? Who has been held accountable? To date, has there been a row of heads on any superior’s desk? Or do they just continue on in much the same way, that way including lugubrious laments on talk television about “sources and methods?” I am not saying that no one has been held accountable–just that nobody seems to care about it. If it has happened, it isn’t news.

But there is not just incompetence in the intelligence world—there is also obvious treachery and malevolence. What is the crime that Julian Assange is guilty of? Revealing classified material, for political purposes, to those not authorized to read it, right? What was it that caused Flynn to have to step down as National Security Advisor? Was it not that classified material was leaked, for political purposes, to those not authorized to read it? So is it not the case that the intelligence community is being run by blood cousins of Julian Assange?

Put another way, it used to be thought by certain quaint souls that national security was a distinct thing from “politics.” That was never entirely true—although it was true that the foreign policy differences between the political parties was less than what was apparent in domestic politics. But although politics was always present in national security issues, it was nothing like it is now. Assange has a certain political agenda that he is pursuing, and none of us voted for him. But the intelligence hotshots are actively using classified intelligence to oppose a president, who was elected by the people. We didn’t vote for them either. So carry on with your dishonorable campaign, but spare us the finger-wagging in the direction of Snowden and Assange. From my perspective here you are quarreling with a mirror.

In defense of the intelligence status quo, people like John McCain are saying the most ludicrous things. Everybody has their knickers in a twist because Trump said that Obama wiretapped Trump Tower. How dast he say that? Well, because—in pursuit of the Trump/Russia connection—news reports, front page of The New York Times news reports, were talking about what wiretapping revealed. There were wiretaps of foreign nationals that happened to pick up people like Flynn in the sweepings. So these intercepts were all according to Hoyle, the line goes. Well, okay, maybe so . . . until they were leaked for political purposes, in high imitation of the ethics of Julian Assange. My theory is that some well-placed CIA analysts got envious of the Ecuadorian digs, and the fact that Pamela Anderson likes to visit there.

If some establishment defender wants to maintain that Assange is a skunk, I am prepared to grant it. But why defend agencies that match Assange’s entire approach to classified info? We are not just dealing with corruption over there, with Assange, Manning, and Snowden. No, I grant the corruption. But it is manifest that the corruption is now total.

As Lord Acton would have put it, were he here, data corrupts, and big data corrupts absolutely.

19
Leave a Reply

avatar
 
12 Comment threads
7 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
13 Comment authors
Andrew KellyTammy P.Tim PaulBike bubba"A" dad Recent comment authors

  Subscribe  
newest oldest
Notify of
Bro. Steve
Guest
Bro. Steve

You’ll never understand this until you grasp the fact that many denizens of the Deep State are simply not loyal to America.

Rob Steele
Guest
Rob Steele

This is Conquest’s third law in action: “The simplest way to explain the behavior of any bureaucratic organization is to assume that it is controlled by a cabal of its enemies.”

Source

Rob Steele
Guest
Rob Steele

Big data corrupts bigly. Come on.

Also, for those who don’t know, which I didn’t until just now, Julian Assange lives in the Ecuadorian embassy in London where it seems he receives visits from Pamela Anderson.

Tim Paul
Guest
Tim Paul

Now you’re up to speed.

Bike bubba
Guest

In her biography of Julia Child (Appetite for Life), Noel Fitch revealed that at least at the outposts Child was at, the predecessor to the CIA completely missed that the Communists were being funded by the Soviets, and that they were not our friends–even when one of their colleagues was murdered for the “crime” of arguing with those manning a checkpoint. I’m no Bircher–and yes, John Birch is the guy I’m talking about–but it was very telling that from the start, the CIA was infested by Communists. And that is from a book which is decidedly friendly to Foggy Bottom… Read more »

ashv
Guest
ashv

Yeah, it’s slightly complicated (and the history has been deliberately obscured by those involved) — but the CIA has always been pro-communist, even after it became anti-Soviet.

adad0
Member

It’s like a total bummer to be an unfettered police force, but with like no police state to go with it!

It’s like tea with out crumpets man!

A total bummer! ????

Ginny Yeager
Guest
Ginny Yeager

Assange is one of the main reasons that we don’t have the guy Andrew Breitbart is referring to here (twitter.com, enter /AndrewBreitbart/status/33636278100561920) as our Secretary of State, God forbid.

Going after Assange is an ad fontem fallacy. His motives are irrelevant to the fact that his organization has exposed some very unconstitutional activities by our government.

adad0
Member

Leakers and Gitmo go together
Like Hillary and lies!????

Kilgore T. Durden
Guest
Kilgore T. Durden

You can hate Assange all you want, but he saved us from Queen Hillary and is doing the job of the media far better than any of the hacks that call themselves journalists.

Bike bubba
Guest

To a degree, but also Hilliary saved us from herself by not going to Wisconsin or Michigan to any degree. That said, it is sobering how many people at the NSA and other agencies are doing blatantly unconstitutional things without blowing the whistle. The pay must be good–30 pieces of silver, I’m told.

Really, over the past decade or so, I’ve been more and more stunned at how people can close ranks around immoral actions. I don’t know that it’s anything new, but it sure is stunning.

insanitybytes22
Member

If you follow Snowden, this is basically what he has said from the very beginning. The corruption is total and I’m now unable to operate honorably within it. That does appear to be the case as we can see it unfolding before our very eyes.

jigawatt
Guest
jigawatt

“I want either less corruption or more opportunity to participate in it.” https://despair.com/products/corruption

OR

“And when everyone’s corrupt … *no one* will be.”

jigawatt
Guest
jigawatt

It is funny how after Trump made his wiretapping claim everybody stopped talking about his election fraud claim. Those tweets have a really short shelf life.

Matt
Guest
Matt

Some day they might learn that Trump doesn’t care if his tweets are true or false.

ashv
Guest
ashv

It’s doubtful that journalists can learn. (If they could learn, they would probably get respectable jobs instead.)

ashv
Guest
ashv

Problems with the CIA go way back. Consider the curious case of CIA head Walter Bedell Smith.

Tammy P.
Guest
Tammy P.

Doug, would you care to provide a link or more thorough reference to The NY Times news report you refer to?

Andrew Kelly
Guest
Andrew Kelly

Zooming out to the idealist big picture, is there even a place for a secret intelligence community? Is it lawful (biblically) for a government to keep secrets from its people? It seems that the world’s intelligence agencies all have the same data (i.e. Russia and the US know all about each other’s secrets). The only people left out of the loop are us common citizens. Isn’t it problematic that we even have national secrets to begin with?