On Kicking the Can’t Down the Road

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I was not surprised at the election of Donald Trump. I was actually expecting that. Neither was I surprised at the decisiveness of his win in Electoral College terms. I was expecting that also. And neither was I surprised that my preferences remained in place—I knew that I would much rather have Trump in the White House than Hillary there. All these things I have addressed in this space already in various ways. But I will tell you what did surprise me, something that I was not expecting at all. I was surprised at the depth of my joy over what happened to the Clinton hubris. I thought I was going to be pleased with the results in Clintonville, but my internal relief thus far has been positively undignified. I am not hugging strangers on the street yet though.millennial-map

BUT . . .

As I have been warning, the danger with backgrounding your principles for the sake of a particular election is that if you win (which the Trump evangelicals did), is that you then find yourself wanting to background them for a longer period, backgrounding them “until a more propitious time.” Your particular issues are not important to the people you helped elect, and so you start kicking the can’t down the road. You start thinking about getting this or that through, you start mulling on the possibility of a second term, and all that stuff, and so you put some important issues down at the bottom of the “old business” part your agenda. If enough time passes, this process is tantamount to forgetting your principles.

One of the places where Trump is positively bad is on the LGBTQ NATO foolishness. Those evangelicals who supported Trump for realpolitik reasons—and I have in mind people like Jerry Falwell, Jr. Eric Metaxas, Franklin Graham, James Dobson, Tony Perkins, et al.—need to be forthright and loud about their continued opposition to the sexual revolution. Now that Clinton is stopped, and praise the Lord for that, we need to turn our attentions to the rising aspirations of Bera, king of Sodom (Gen. 14:2).

In the meantime, people like Russell Moore, evangelicals who opposed Trump, for reasons of their own are quietly setting the stage for sidling away from the biblical position on LGBTQ AMTRACK. Moore is starting to do this by saying that one of the pressing issues of our day is the stability of the family. By the quaintest of oaths, it is not. The issue before us today is the definition of the family.

The practical problem is that if conservative evangelicals back away from their opposition to the sexual revolution because they don’t want to jeopardize their “influence” in a Trump administration, we have lost an important voice on a crucial issue. And if the cool kid evangelicals back away from opposition to the sexual revolution because, well, they are the cool kids, then we have also lost an unimportant voice on a crucial issue. So who does that leave, besides Tim Bayly?

The theological problem has to do with how we define righteousness for the public square. Russell Moore doesn’t want to build a Christian nation except on racial issues, which is like wanting a nation to be Christian every day between 9:45 am and 11:12 am. If Jesus is Lord of all, we must listen to Him on racial issues in the public square. If He isn’t, then we don’t have to. What we don’t get to do is pick and choose. Under the new covenant there is no unique chosen nation, of course. In the new covenant, every nation must be discipled, and there is no exceptionalism there. But whether you want righteousness in tiny slivers, or righteousness across the board, you still have to define it.

We must call the American people back to repentance. And the obvious questions are why and who says?

So what we must remember is that we must stand for what we stand for. If you stand for part of biblical revelation when opposing Obama and Clinton, and grow deathly quiet in your opposition to the obvious corruptions in what Trump advocates, then whatever you think you are doing, it is not standing for Christ. It is not engaging with culture. Too many Christians think that engaging with culture means surrendering to culture, and we define liberals and conservatives among us by how rapidly or slowly they want to do the surrendering.

Sexual perversion is why God destroyed the cities of the plain (Gen. 19:24). Sexual perversion is why the Lord’s brother Jude told us that the cities of the plain were destroyed in this particular way to serve as a warning to insolent and horny empires until the end of the world (Jude 7). If you are a Christian, you must contend earnestly for this, regardless of who won the election, and regardless of how pleased you find yourself to be over it.

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Ginny Yeager
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Ginny Yeager

I, too, have been doing the happy dance and feeling enormous gratitude to God. Thank you, Doug, for your leadership in leading us to sing the Psalms. For me, the burden to pray had been building for the past months and reached a FF crescendo in the week prior to the election. I felt an overwhelming desire to sing from Cantus Christi, especially Psalm 2 and 5. Also, thank you for pursuing weekly communion which brings great grace, especially in surfacing sin. Thank you for leading us in studying the Word of God, in taking our children out of the… Read more »

Rob Steele
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Rob Steele

I get the joy. Here’s the olive branch I’m holding out:

So, leftys, liberals, progressives, I know I’d be tore up if it went the other way so I’m so sorry for your loss despite being glad my side won.

Let’s hope my side treats power with some modesty. It’s a heavy responsibility and not a birthright. We need to learn to persuade through reason instead of ridicule and to respect our opponents instead of dehumanizing them. We all, left and right, need to learn to love our neighbor.

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

That is so true and well stated. I wish that everyone would take your olive branch and learn to appeal to the best in one another. I don’t think I have ever gloated when my side of an issue won, and I am so grateful now that no one has gloated around me. Thank you for such a timely word of reminder.

John
Member
ashv
Guest
ashv

My daughter was sobbing Tuesday night as the election results came in because she was scared for her Muslim friend.

Parenting failure.

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

Wherein does the failure consist? Producing a tender-hearted daughter? Or in allowing her to have a Muslim friend?

If the latter, what if God wants this little girl to convert her Muslim friend?

Luke Pride
Guest

errr, or maybe the fact that her muslim friend will grow up believing Islam is good and healthy? Heaven forbid we stand against evil ideologies like Communism, Nazism, Racism or Islam because their Children might find have to face how awful what they are a part of is. Let’s tell them evil is good, or there is no such thing as evil.

Jane
Member

The parenting failure is not allowing the daughter to have a Muslim friend per se, depending on how much interaction is encouraged. We should never teach our kids “you can’t be friends with that person” but young children should not be having play dates with people we don’t want influencing them. And little kids will call people their “friends” because they’re in the same class or on the same soccer team. That said, the parenting failure is in having exposed a child too young to process it properly to the details of political matters and hypothetical fears, or putting her… Read more »

Jonathan
Guest
Jonathan

It’s hard for me to imagine a political blackout pervasive enough that peers, other adults, television, radio, etc. won’t give her some sort of idea of what’s been going on for the last year.

JP Stewart
Member
JP Stewart

Just be a realist and tell her the Muslim friend will be fine. The only possible threat is a mass deportation back to Muslim countries where terrible things actually do happen to them…and that’s very unlikely.

Christopher
Member
Christopher

In allowing her to be fear mongered.

bethyada
Member

So did you get to vote in the US elections Jill?

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

Not this time. But my daughter, who was running late, asked me to fill in her ballot so she could drop it off. She and I have reasonably similar views so there was not much temptation to undermine the will of the special snowflake. (Except, and I might deny this under torture, I changed her yes vote on whether to make cigs $2 more expensive a pack.)

bethyada
Member

So you can vote? But you didn’t?

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

No, my citizenship is still in the works. It takes quite a while,and I am in the busiest citizenship court district in the country. And they don’t let you vote in an election if you have only been a citizen for a certain number of months. I find that weird because long-standing green card holders are encouraged to become citizens, yet a roadblock is thrown in the way of a major incentive to do it. But I expect there is a reason which has not occurred to me. I heard from my cousins all over England and Scotland who were… Read more »

bethyada
Member

In person I have laughed with my American friends who voted Clinton to a man. They see the flaws in Trump but can’t see many in Clinton other than she may not have been the best candidate. Everything negative about her is seen conservative propaganda to discredit her. My liberal friends are placing the same stuff on the social media feed as the US liberals. The conservatives less so. I haven’t said much in public media as I don’t like Trump, but many of may conservative friends who probably feel as I do have noted the absolute nonsense that has… Read more »

Jonathan
Guest
Jonathan

Isn’t simply “politics” the politics of hypocrisy?

I mean, the Republicans are the ones who just nominated Trump and ended up voting for him almost across the board, right?

bethyada
Member

I may have to think about this further. Hypocrisy may not be rare in politics in general, but I increasing see left politics as profoundly hypocritical; as if it is one of their fundamental principles. (Though I think there are left politicians who have integrity). I don’t wish to defend Trump in any form, though I would not lump those who voted for him in the same category as him. Many opposed him within the party, and many outside also opposed him. I don’t see the numbers who voted for him as being particularly different from previous elections. The categories… Read more »

Dan Jones
Member

Amen, Rob. I’m honestly and truly not trying to be argumentative, but when you say we need to persuade through reason, I have to say that’s not going to work. Yes, reason needs to be involved and utilized in all we do and say, but the base and the root of our arguments needs to be love. The left has spent pretty much a century changing this society incrementally. We need to realize it’s not going to change overnight and we need to realize that the arguments and persuasions they used were emotional at their core. Those emotions still exist.… Read more »

Len
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Len

The basis and root of our arguments is not love, but “Thus Saith The Lord!”

Dan Jones
Member

“If I speak in the tongues of men or of angels, but do not have love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal.” 1 Cor. 13:1

adad0
Member

And God is…………………………………………………………………….? And His Word is………………………………………………………………? 4 Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. 5 It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. 6 Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. 7 It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. (All the things opposition politics is short on.) Being Word Grounded is being Loving. It’s hard to be Loving if one is not in submission to The Word Made Flesh! ;… Read more »

Jane
Member

And what saith the Lord is the greatest of all and the greatest commandment?

ashv
Guest
ashv

The left has spent pretty much a century changing this society
incrementally. We need to realize it’s not going to change overnight

Why?

Arwenb
Guest
Arwenb

Because just like losing weight, what took you years to gain is going to take time to lose.

Not necessarily the same amount of time, but time nonetheless.

Katecho
Member

Perhaps ashv believes that Trump is the political equivalent of liposuction? The liberals thought Obama was messianic too.

Or, perhaps ashv believes that God can grant a widespread revival with repentance to heal our land. In that case, we are in agreement, although there is still that issue of the national debt that will have to be defaulted on, in some fashion, and that default is probably best done in a controlled and extended fashion, rather than all at once.

ashv
Guest
ashv

Trump is not likely to change anything.

(Edit:. Poor choice of wording. Trump is not likely to fix anything.)

RandMan
Guest
RandMan

Uh, because there are only so many of the xtian version of the wanna-be, violent, ‘let’s execute blasphemers’ cartoon characters out there. And you are all pretty chickens*t when it comes down to actually risking your neck about it. White nativist bravery mostly gets its workout swapping out Pepe avatars, posting on fringe blogs where you are the fringiest element, (and voting in candidates who don’t actually care about anything other than using your bigotry to get them what they want.)

I would love to see you start the revolution ashv. (Please do a better job than Manson.)

ashv
Guest
ashv

The truth is not in you.

RandMan
Guest
RandMan

Nor reality in you.

ashv
Guest
ashv

You’re assuming symmetry where none exists. They want us dead, we want to be left alone.

Persuasion is only possible if communication is possible — and if reasoning is possible. Progressives have denied logic and facts in pursuit of their false religion.

Progressives have decided that everyone to their right deserves to be ignored or silenced. The time for persuasion is past.

In other words, they want war.

The best way to prevent war is to make them terrified of the consequences of voicing their blasphemous beliefs. A few public executions would do the job. No mercy for the enemies of God.

Bro. Steve
Guest
Bro. Steve

Dude… seriously? You want some blasphemers executed?

Like, who?

ashv
Guest
ashv

Need we be picky? Start enough investigations and I’m certain you could find three or four invigorating capital charges. Cecile Richards, Dennis Hastert, and John Podesta seem like good candidates.

RandMan
Guest
RandMan

Hahaha! Thank you for that you confederate cut up!

Rob Steele
Guest
Rob Steele

You advocate adopting the enemy’s strategy. It’s what they expect, it’s what they understand and look where it got them.

On the other hand, I’m game for some swamp draining.

ashv
Guest
ashv

Only takes one side to start a war.

yom24hrday
Member
yom24hrday

Trump did Trump them all !!! democrats, rhinos, libtard press, corrupt FBI, corrupt administration, corrupt so called justice department, corrupt hollywood, corrupt papers, corrupt radio Managua, ie. NPR. An update: what I wrote below came to pass, God did indeed use Trump to trump them all Praise God! Ok folks, this is getting just bizarre! I’m going to have to bring back an earlier post and then update it again for this breaking news about Hillary/Bill. Hold on to your hats. Here is my earlier post: Well if Cruz had a chance I’d vote for him, or Paul. But I’ll… Read more »

doug sayers
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doug sayers

Fair point Doug, I doubt R Moore would disagree with your definition of family.

But if we are going to press righteousness “across the board” then we should get serious about opposing *all* the sins for which God was displeased with Sodom (even if it makes us sound like ascetics or bleeding heart liberals):

Behold, this was the iniquity of thy sister Sodom, pride, fulness of bread, and abundance of idleness was in her and in her daughters, neither did she strengthen the hand of the poor and needy. Ez 16

BDash76
Guest
BDash76

Moore will soon change his mind…. , just like they have on feminism

Michael
Guest
Michael

you sound like you are hoping he will

BDash76
Guest
BDash76

he will, he is swayed by culture like Chandler, who trains young men to be good husbands by teaching them home making skills… modern christians are hilarious!

Andrew Kelly
Guest
Andrew Kelly

Regarding the picture on this post, of what the millennial vote looked like, I am curious to know what your thoughts are on the fact that millennials are vastly more unbelieving than the older generations. What happens when the older generation dies off? How is the millennial generation to be converted before that tipping point happens?

(And, of course, I am not implying that there are not enormous sin problems in the older generataions as well.)

adad0
Member

As has been noted before, youth tends to be wasted on the young.! ; – )
Lots of kids finally grow up.

ArwenB
Guest
ArwenB

Usually about the time they have kids themselves or try to buy a house.

Wendell Dávila Helms
Guest
Wendell Dávila Helms

It’s probably worth noting that that map was likely compiled by the same pollsters that told us Clinton was going to win decisively, yet without any accountability at all, and therefore even more flexibility to distort reality. That’s not to say younger voters didn’t tend in that direction, but I’m betting the extent is badly exaggerated.

Jane
Member

I haven’t take the time to track this down, but I’ve heard that this map is based on polling done before the election. I don’t even trust exit polling, but asserting “this is how people voted” on anything other than exit polling is ridiculous to the point of dishonest.

Jonathan
Guest
Jonathan

The polls weren’t actually saying that Clinton was going to win decisively. I think the final polling average had her with a 3.5% lead. Fivethirtyeight projected that to about 70-30 odds in Clinton’s favor, with Trump likely to win the electoral college if Clinton’s popular vote edge dropped below 2%. It was the most uncertain election since 2004.

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

I am not sure this time, A Dad. The pattern when I was young was that most kids went to church or at least Sunday School (or catechism class) at least occasionally. Even if they were not church attenders, most parents talked to their kids about Jesus and Bible stories and moral standards. Kids were often very active in their teens because church youth groups were almost the only entertainment on offer that parents permitted and kids could afford. Then, college came along, and kids stopped going to church. Sometimes they said they had lost their faith. This would continue… Read more »

adad0
Member

Well Jilly ,we will have to be on our toes , as providence would have it , to help pick up the pieces , when those kids hit that big wall of darkness . ????☀️

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

Well, God can do anything, but I do share your concern. I read somewhere that fewer than 7% of people in England go to church. I can see our going the same route–just a lot more slowly.

Scott Dempsey
Guest
Scott Dempsey

“But I will tell you what did surprise me, something that I was not expecting at all. I was surprised at the depth of my joy over what happened to the Clinton hubris. I thought I was going to be pleased with the results in Clintonville, but my internal relief thus far has been positively undignified. I am not hugging strangers on the street yet though.” Me too brother. As the last holdout in my office against Trump, my joy wednesday morning was noticed by many. I happily admitted my own surprise at the depths of my relief.

Eagle_Eyed
Guest
Eagle_Eyed

Trump was never the vehicle to enacting a more godly or Christian nation, he was the vehicle for destroying a political/social/moral system which persecuted the godly and Christian. With that apparatus now out of place, it’s our turn to help lead the nation back to Christ. God blessed us all and saved you from yourself by preordaining Trump’s election, and with it, and assertive and ascendant Christian right.

Arwenb
Guest
Arwenb

It’s not gone yet. There’s still more work to be done.

And it should be done quickly before the crybullies compose themselves enough to emerge from their safe spaces

Katecho
Member

Eagle_Eyed wrote:

With that apparatus now out of place, it’s our turn to help lead the nation back to Christ.

I’m not seeing the sea change that Eagle_Eyed is seeing, but I can agree with his sentiment. I hope other Trumpers see it as an opportunity for the Gospel. Although, if Trump had lost, would Eagle_Eyed have concluded that it’s not our turn to lead the nation back to Christ?

adad0
Member

“The theological problem has to do with how we define righteousness for the public square.”……..”then whatever you think you are doing, it is not standing for Christ. It is not engaging with culture. ”

How did Joseph, The mother of Moses, Esther, Mordecia, Obadiah, and Daniel define righteousness in the public square, and engage with the cultures they found themselves in?

I think we can agree that they were as shrewd as snakes and as inccocent as doves.
What does that look like in our time? What did it look like in their time?

Does it look like this post? ; – )

Clayton Hutchins
Guest
Clayton Hutchins

I think you’re too hard on Moore. Are you critiquing him because he didn’t mention LGBTQ issues in his Erasmus talk, or that he mentioned the “stability” of the family instead of “definition” of the family? I think it is a stretch to say either constitutes a sidestepping of the issue.

insanitybytes22
Member

Wilson, sexual perversion was only a part of why God destroyed those cities. We need to remember that he also didn’t like the fact that people were starving in the midst of plenty and that the poor were being mistreated. We always ignore that part and obsess over sexual perversion because it is far more interesting, but we shouldn’t. I’m quite pleased with this election, but forced to contain my excitement since I am surrounded by long faces, weepy people, and rioters. Just the same, the path forward looks good, IF Christians remember to reflect Christ. The actual racists and… Read more »

Jon Swerens
Member

Seems Jude also “obsessed” over the sexual pervesion part. I mean, I’m not saying you don’t have a point, but how do you square your perspective with the New Testament?

insanitybytes22
Member

I’m not sure I understand the question? Christ of the New testament is all about recognizing the poor and doing for the least of these, so I don’t see a contradiction.

In Western Christianity we tend to be very materialistic, full of idolatry, and obsessed over the sexual sins of others. I think this is in direct conflict with both the old and the new testament.

ashv
Guest
ashv

Paul seemed pretty obsessed with the sexual sins of others in 1 Corinthians.

JP Stewart
Member
JP Stewart

“and obsessed over the sexual sins of others”

As was the book of Proverbs, St. Paul and many others. Good thing we modern snowflakes know better.

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

If ME has it on good authority that God is not interested in sexual sin,I wish she would pass that on to the Vatican before I’m really too old to find a gentleman to cheer my declining years.

Jon Swerens
Member

The passage cited by Wilson, Jude 7, refutes your interpretation of how we are to read the story of Sodom and Gomorrah. And you keep using the emotional phrase “obsessed over the sins of others.” I have no idea why you keep saying that.

insanitybytes22
Member

That is not my interpretation of how we should read the problem of Sodom, that is what is stated in the bible.

JP Stewart
Member
JP Stewart

“In a similar way, Sodom and Gomorrah and the surrounding towns gave themselves up to sexual immorality and perversion.” Jude 7

Can’t get any clearer than that.

insanitybytes22
Member

It’s a big bible. You could read Amos, Ezekiel, Or several other passages that speak of the sins of the cities. Oppressing the poor, economic crimes, and being inhospitable to strangers are significant issues.

ashv
Guest
ashv

Who is oppressing the poor?

insanitybytes22
Member

The kings of the cities of the plains according to the bible. If you dont like it, take it up with God. It’s plainly stated in multiple places. I assume Wilson is aware of this, so I am somewhat disappointed he failed to mention it.

ashv
Guest
ashv

Who, today, is oppressing the poor? (With regard to Sodom and Ezekiel 16:49, yes, Pastor Wilson has addressed this, multiple times — as a few seconds of research would inform you.)

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

Sometimes I have oppressed the poor, but I think it has mostly been through thoughtlessness. I oppress the poor when I keep a minimum wage gardener waiting a day or two for his money, or when I expect my hair stylist to fit me in right before closing time so that I am cutting into her time-off without paying her extra for it. Or when I accept a low bid offer for a job that I know should be costing more. Or if I ask a worker for a favor knowing that he needs his job too much to feel… Read more »

Arwenb
Guest
Arwenb

I have pointed out before that a place can’t get much more inhospitable than by gang-raping all of the male travelers unfortunate enough to step through the gates.

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

Assuming that you are right, and that the injustice and uncharitableness of the Sodomites were an offense to God, do you believe that the sexual behavior described therein was also offensive to God? If I were a gay convert and asked you, “Does the Bible say that my having gay sex is wrong?” how would you answer me?

adad0
Member

Matt 12: 33 “Make a tree good and its fruit will be good, or make a tree bad and its fruit will be bad, for a tree is recognized by its fruit. 34 You brood of vipers, how can you who are evil say anything good? For the mouth speaks what the heart is full of. 35 A good man brings good things out of the good stored up in him, and an evil man brings evil things out of the evil stored up in him. 36 But I tell you that everyone will have to give account on the… Read more »

ashv
Guest
ashv

Evangelical Christians are some of the most generous people in the country. Who, exactly are you accusing of mistreating the poor?

Jonathan
Guest
Jonathan

That’s like saying that Republicans are some of the most honest politicians in the country.

I’m sure there were Pharisees who were throwing their 2% tithe into the collection boxes while every other bit of their lives was driven towards the oppression of those with less than them as well.

ashv
Guest
ashv

How are evangelical Christians oppressing the poor?

Jonathan
Guest
Jonathan

“We know love by this, that he laid down his life for us–and we ought to lay down our lives for one another. How does God’s love abide in anyone who has the world’s goods and sees a brother or sister in need and yet refuses help?” – 1 John 3:16-17 Has there ever been a Christian people who “had the world’s goods” to a greater degree that the evangelical church of America today? And are we really unaware of brothers and sisters in need? Then why do we continue to have so much of the world’s goods, and actively… Read more »

ashv
Guest
ashv

Interesting. Sounds like you go to a pretty unpleasant church.

JohnM
Guest
JohnM

And to think, people use to blame these things on the Jews.

Jonathan
Guest
Jonathan

I never thought of it that way. I only know the stereotypes because I don’t personally know any Jewish people who work in finance, but it would be interesting to see how well their behavior matches up with Old Testament instructions on finances. Then again, it’s interesting to see how Christian behavior matches up with both Old Testament and New Testament instructions on finances.

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

I have Jewish relatives who work in finance–not many, probably about the same number as my gentile relatives who do. I think that perhaps finance is so regulated nowadays that a person’s religious beliefs might not have much impact in an institutional sense. For example, a person who works for a mortgage company isn’t going to allowed to establish a debt jubilee! My understanding is that for many centuries Christians were not allowed to lend money at interest, and that this coincided with a time when Jews were not permitted to enter the professions. This resulted in Jews becoming money… Read more »

adad0
Member

You know Jilly, one of my Jewish friends and I did notice one time, that Jewish stereotypes, and Yankee stereotypes seem to have a lot of overlap! ; – )
We were amused, ..well……because of the humor overlap! ; – )

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

I can see that. If you listen to Brits complaining about Yanks (something I would rather not listen to), it is a lot of the same stuff: sharp in business, overly ambitious, obsessed with money, vulgarly ostentatious, and so on. Envy comes in many forms, none of them pretty.

adad0
Member

Yanks? ” Oversexed, Overpaid and Over here! ” ; – )

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

That’s what my dear mother said, growing up in England’s main army town in World War 2. Of course, that did not stop her from marrying a Canadian! She couldn’t get over how tall and handsome they were. All those lumberjack genes.

Jane
Member

I think A dad was referring to Yankee vs. Southern, not Yank vs. Brit. Still, it just serves as another example of your point. Northerners so inclined to engage in similar behavior will accuse southerners of being just as sharp, but by means of an insincere honeyed manner and clannishness of a backhanded rather than straightforward sort. If you want to despise another group, you WILL manage to come up with a rationale for why it’s justified.

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

When I first read the comment, I took Yank to mean New Englander and I could not see much similarity between a people who pride themselves on being expressive and emotional, and a people who pride themselves on being just the opposite. Canadians, I think, have a temperamental affinity to New Englanders. I remember once chiding my daughter for betraying her Canadian heritage by making an unholy fuss about some trifling ailment. I told her that a true Canadian says “I’m fine, thank you” even when her leg is being chewed by a bear. My daughter replied that when it… Read more »

ashv
Guest
ashv

One of the Massachusetts judges at the time of the American Revolution, Peter Oliver, noted that Jews had significant populations in major American cities at the time — except Boston: This Business was so notable a School to teach the Art of tricking & foreswearing, that it became proverbial, “that no Jew could get his Bread in Boston” whereas in most of the other Provinces there were Numbers of those trading Israelites, & in some of them Synagogues of most elegant Structure. … it was much to be wondered at, that there were no more Apostates from Judaism, since ye.… Read more »

adad0
Member

Not to mention Yankee secret plans for world domination! ; – )

Nathan Smith
Member

I really think your beef with Moore boils down to a difference in being post-mil and pre-mil. I think he just sees the church as a remnant surrounded by a pagan world on its way to hell, instead of the work of God on His way to redeeming the whole world. I dont think you will convince Moore or those that agree with him, which are many, by attacking the application of his eschatology. I’m not sure there is any way you could convince them, but if there is, then its reasoned arguing from the scripture. (That’s how I was… Read more »

Justin Dillehay
Guest
Justin Dillehay

Lloyd,
You’ve managed to perfectly state my own thoughts on this matter. Thanks.

ashv
Guest
ashv

Judas was Christ focused too — once.

Nathan Smith
Member

So was the devil himself.

Andrew Lohr
Member

With Trump coming in, do the Democrats want the Tea Party to arise to try to steer him in the right direction?

ashv
Guest
ashv

The Tea Party was racist, as you may recall. So no, that wouldn’t help.

Andrew Lohr
Member

Arrogance lost, and a few of the arrogant (why call them “elite” considering the messes they’ve made?) have come down a peg or two, but some sound as self-righteous as ever.

ashv
Guest
ashv

Nice map. Now, let’s see a map of 18-25 year olds who have four grandparents born in America.

Matt
Guest
Matt

Does it matter? The votes are counted just the same.

ashv
Guest
ashv

This time, yes. That can be changed for the future.

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

Gee, I am surprised you would disqualify my special snowflake. The Jewish grandparents who you would find objectionable were all born in Chicago. The grandparents who were not born in America had that lovely, pure to the last drop Anglo-Saxon blood. Do you need to tweak your definitions?

ashv
Guest
ashv

Despite the typical Jewish stereotype, I don’t actually think about Jews constantly. (Hint: Hart-Celler.)

Jonathan
Guest
Jonathan

He would also disqualify Trump’s own children, of course.

Jane
Member

And while we’re busy making irrelevant distinctions, let’s see a map of people whose middle names start with M!

Because, yeah, the grandson of two WWII vets, one of whom married a war bride, definitely should NOT be trusted with the franchise.

ashv
Guest
ashv

You think “from America” and “not from America” are irrelevant distinctions? They’re certainly not a binary distinction, as your example points out, but plenty of meaningful ones aren’t.

I’m skeptical of the idea of voting in general, but I’m still surprised by how people think about it.

RandMan
Guest
RandMan

Yet here you are reaping the benefits of living in the greatest country on earth, with more freedoms and possibilities than any humans who have ever before lived on this planet. And you squander it as a bigot, playing christian/white identity politics. A fantasy confederate skeptical of voting.

As if your ancestors didn’t immigrate here at some point. What a difference a generation makes.

ashv
Guest
ashv

The truth is not in you.

RandMan
Guest
RandMan

Nor reality in you.

antexw
Member

Amen, Doug.
Yes, we must remain faithful to the Lord to speak a challenging/opposing message of repentance even to/about those we in some sense politically favor (e.g. favored enough to vote for, or even less favored so as not to vote for but still favored enough to see voted in given the most likely alternative) just as Nathan was faithful to the Lord to still speak a message (even implicitly) of repentance to David (to challenge/oppose David’s pretensive autonomous reasoning/behavior), whom Nathan (politically) favored (2 Sa 12:1-13,14-15).

ashv
Guest
ashv

Another map for your consideration: Change in vote margin since 2012

adad0
Member

Is it just me, or does it look like Wilson lives in Hillary county?

kateymagill
Guest
kateymagill

I generally very much enjoy your insights, Pastor Wilson, but I feel that for as often as you deride Russell Moore you ought to have more substantive reasons. It begins to feel personal.

ashv
Guest
ashv

Taking money from Soros isn’t enough reason?

kateymagill
Guest
kateymagill

in the context in which his organization did it, no.

John
Guest
John

I thought I was going to be pleased with the results in Clintonville, but my internal relief thus far has been positively undignified. I still don’t understand you. Clinton’s loss gives you relief, but you weren’t willing act in order to cause it to happen. You were effectually ambivalent in action, yet you obviously aren’t actually ambivalent. There seems to be an unexplained abyss between your beliefs and your actions. On one hand you completely acknowledge that Clinton is worse for the country, worse for the church, worse for individual freedom, worse in upholding the constitution, worse in the abortion… Read more »

ashv
Guest
ashv

Voting for Trump would be ritually impure, perhaps.

John F. Kennedy
Guest
John F. Kennedy

Actually, Doug doesn’t understand arithmetic very well (he’s from Idaho). He thought that voting for someone who has no chance to win would cause both Clinton and Trump to lose.

Luke Pride
Guest

Pretty sure Trump and company, while not crusading against sexual perversion, have no plans to make it illegal to disapprove of it. Sadly that’s a big step for this country, and one evangelicals like “Moore” stand against, who would have everyone keep their moral opinions to themselves. Trump is not good on this issue, but he is better than many of our evangelical leaders, who chide those who would not celebrate a gay wedding that they are hypocrites because they will make cakes or do pictures for other sinners. The fact that Trump is ahead morally of these evangelical leaders… Read more »

jigawatt
Guest
jigawatt

In the meantime, people like Russell Moore, evangelicals who opposed Trump, for reasons of their own are quietly setting the stage for sidling away from the biblical position on LGBTQ AMTRACK. Moore is starting to do this by saying that one of the pressing issues of our day is the stability of the family. By the quaintest of oaths, it is not. The issue before us today is the definition of the family. This is a big deal, here, Doug. Are you saying that Moore himself (and others like him) are on the path to LGBTQ accomodation? Is Moore going… Read more »

Unilateral Divorce Is Unconsti
Guest
Unilateral Divorce Is Unconsti

But doing as you suggest would (gasp!) require the sort of sacrifice John the Baptist made in the court of another lascivious ruler, wouldn’t it? After some 50 years of institutionalized adultery / serial polygamy in the church of Jesus Christ, repentance would require re-revision of marriage doctrine and calling it what Jesus consistently called it–not to even mention acknowledging where Jesus and Paul repeatedly said it leads, if not actually, physically repented. (Matt. 5:29-30; 1 Cor. 6:9-10 and Gal. 5:10-21). Evangelicals have elected the poster child for the sexual revolution because they have become comfortable in this defilement. #lukesixteeneighteen

ashv
Guest
ashv

Could’ve been worse. They could have elected Jeb! instead.

Steve Perry
Guest
Steve Perry

Tim Bayly is already one of the last men standing, on this critical issue.

40 ACRES & A KARDASHIAN
Guest
40 ACRES & A KARDASHIAN

Like Doug Wilson, Tim Bayly is extremely confused. He’s racequeer, but not genderqueer. He celebrates tranny adoptions, (his own son did a tranny adoption) but thinks gay marriage is bad. That’s not a tenable position. Race queering leads ineluctably to gender queering. As Barnabas just wrote: Those who claim that Social Justice can be compartmentalized, pushing ahead on racial radicalism but holding the line on homosexuality for instance, are either duplicitous or don’t understand the phenomenon of Social Justice. Social Justice must advance. The churches have made a deal with the devil to gain a little social approval. https://dougwils.com/s7-engaging-the-culture/kicking-cant-road.html#comment-2998705591

Katecho
Member

Racequeer? Racial radicalism? I notice that neither 40 ACRES nor Barnabas have the courage to actually define what they mean by these terms, so that they can be examined.

If 40 ACRES is referring to adoption of children of another race as “tranny adoption”, then 40 ACRES is just being flatly un-Christ-like and inventing his own rules about race that have nothing to do with Scripture.

jigawatt
Guest
jigawatt

then 40 ACRES is just being flatly un-Christ-like

Careful now, you might hurt his feelings.

Seriously though, has he actually professed Christ? Something tells me he would be unable/unwilling to do so unambiguously.

40 ACRES & A KARDASHIAN
Guest
40 ACRES & A KARDASHIAN

I couldn’t agree more, Kate. Barnabas really needs to come clean about his true beliefs.

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

I read a comment on another site by someone–not 40 Acres–who occasionally posts here, and I found it a real head scratcher. It said that God sent the Great Flood because people were engaging in interracial sex and marriage. Is there any conceivable scriptural authority for this? We Catholics were taught that it was human wickedness in general–the seven deadly sins in full flood, so to speak–that made God repent of creating humanity.

Conserbatives_conserve_little
Guest
Conserbatives_conserve_little

The fear in the left is a great witnessing opportunity. Invite a progressive into your home. Witness to them. Jesus said that there as more people wanting into heaven than there are people willing to lead them there. Is that still true? Yes? Then do something. Star inviting and start witnessing.

LittleRedMachine
Guest
LittleRedMachine

I don’t think anyone in the evangelical community was or is under any delusion that Donald Trump has a secret copy of The Institutes of Institutes of Biblical Law on his bookshelf. What we did see is a flawed man who stepped up to the plate and campaigned on issues that no one else in the Republican Party would take on: trade, immigration, nation building, corporate inversions, the insanity of funding ‘moderate’ jihadists…. etc. He also came across, however imperfectly, as someone who had a common sense approach to rampant injustice… economic, social, government corruption. For example, pointing out the… Read more »

Romanized
Guest
Romanized

Does Russell Moore have the job Doug wants? The trolling of Moore, while interesting, is still unfortunate.

ashv
Guest
ashv

What’s unfortunate about it?

Romanized
Guest
Romanized

1) Moore is a fine leader who is right on 95% of the cultural issues.

2) Doug’s critiques sound like nit-picks. He’s going to need to strain a little harder if he is going to land a solid blow.

ashv
Guest
ashv

Being in favour of open borders negates all other cultural issues.

Romanized
Guest
Romanized

Now if that’s what he said…not really.

Jill Smith
Member
Jill Smith

Was anyone else relieved to learn that Mr. and Mrs. Trump will not be allowed to redecorate the Lincoln Bedroom?

adad0
Member

Not even a grand piano?????