Well, It Seemed Like a Good Idea

“Individual imagination and fancy will more and more take possession of the technical resources of the new architecture, of its spatial harmonies, of its functional qualities, and will use them as the ground work, or rather framework, of a new beauty which will crown this expected renascence with splendour” (Walter Gropius, The New Architecture and …

Why “Nothing” Is Important

If there is any place where the bone-chilling ugliness of our modern world is both displayed and advanced, it is in the liturgical poverty of the modern evangelical world. And surprisingly, one of the reasons for this is the church’s embarrassment over the doctrine of creation ex nihilo. We have a real problem with this. …

Islamist Foxes and English Hens

“The British government is now in danger of falling into the same trap as the French. After the Muslim riots in France in autumn 2005, the French government, unable to regain control, went in desperation to those who had radicalized the community’s youths in the first place and begged them to restore order. The result …

Evangeliberals

Of course, modern evangelicalism and liberalism are not identical. They have differing histories, traditions, customs, and so forth. As movements, they have compromised with worldliness in very different ways, and oddly enough, that particular difference reveals their internal similarities. Whatever the external distinctions, compromise driven by unbelief always ends up looking and smelling the same. …

A Three Way Collision

“This has managed to obscure two absolutely fundamental problems for the Church. The first is that the dominant contemporary political force within Islam is an ideology that seeks to destroy Christianity and its values. The second is that, because the Church has failed to resolve its deeply ambiguous and conflict-laden attitude towards the Jews, it …

Sin and Grace as Culturally Potent

“The Augustinian theology and philosophy of history with their intense realization of the burden of inherited evil under which the human race laboured and their conception of divine grace as a continually renewed source of supernatural energy which transforms human nature and changes the course of history—all this had become part of the spiritual patrimony …

Falling for Anything

“And as post-moral Britain demanded that ever more constraints be knocked away, the Church was forced further and further into hollowing out its own identity. As it renounced its own culture, it embraced others, while never ceasing to grovel for its onetime sin of believing in itself” (Melanie Phillips, Londonistan, p. 140).