Paige Patterson at Colonus

Show Outline with Links

Introduction

When controversies like this arise, we are regularly reminded that powerful Christian leaders should not be beyond the reach of accountability. This is absolutely correct, and we should also be reminded that the men who summarily dispatched Paige Patterson are themselves powerful Christian leaders, and therefore not beyond the reach of accountability. One of the best ways to maintain an atmosphere conducive to real accountability for all is to cultivate a spirit of biblical fair-mindedness—in every direction.

What I would like to do this morning in the time allotted is provide a few links, then spend a little time discussing some truths laid down in 1 Timothy 5, and then last, ask three questions of those who dismissed Paige Patterson.

A Couple Caveats First

I am not yet willing to say that the firing of Patterson was unjust. I am saying that the circumstances seem pretty fishy, but I am not accusing the board. I am asking questions that I think the board should answer, and I am doing this because I think that they should have the full opportunity to explain themselves before people make up their minds. So these are questions, not accusations. This is how it looks from outside. Can you explain for us how these appearances do not really represent the full picture?

I have served on multiple boards over a number of decades, and I have been involved in more than one messy firing. There have been occasions when we could talk about it, and other times when we couldn’t. I know how complicated these things can be, and so if they had simply fired Patterson, I don’t think the public necessarily has a right to ask any questions they want. But if they fired him for “enabling abuse,” and he denies it, then I believe there are legitimate questions that can be asked.

First the Links

As more elements of the story straggle out into daylight, the more we should be reminded of the importance of Proverbs 18:17, which I reproduce here in a colloquial translation. “The first person to speak always seems right until someone comes and asks the right questions” (ERV). So first is an account from a friend of Paige Patterson, followed by a statement from Southwestern, followed by a round-up from The Christian Post.

I am leaving the comments open on this post so that others may post any other relevant links. But please, as a courtesy to me, do not post any comments that illustrate why you should never be selected for jury duty.

Two or Three Witnesses

Following the advice that Solomon gives in Proverbs does not mean that you read up on a case until you get to the first plausible account that suits your political alliances, in order to homestead there. Rather, it means that you weigh and sift the evidence, not in a state of suspended belief in every direction, but rather with a decided bias on behalf of the accused. This is what the presumption of innocence means. Our practice of this (still) in our courts of law is part of the legacy of Christendom. The burden of proof is on the accuser.

But it may be said by some that this doesn’t apply because Patterson has not been accused of a crime. He was simply fired, and he serves at the pleasure of the board, right?

Of course the board has the right to fire him. He does serve at the pleasure of the board. But that is not the question—the question is whether they have the right to fire him for “enabling abuse” if he didn’t. Can a man’s boss fire him at any time? In a free country, sure. Does he have the right to fire him for embezzling if he is not an embezzler? Well, no. Our criminal courts learned the principles of biblical due process from church courts originally. Now it seems to me that pagan courts still remember the lessons when the teacher has perhaps forgotten them.

So if the board had fired him with no comment that would have been their right. If they had fired him because of declining enrollment at the seminary, that would have been their right as well. But if they fire him for “enabling abuse,” and he denies it, and public political pressure to fire was being applied, and he had no opportunity to answer the particular charge, then we might have a real problem.

If the person accused is in fact guilty, a person who insists on the guilt being established beyond a reasonable doubt is not complicit in the guilt. One of the sins of our very muddled age is the sin of believing that if someone insists upon hearing both sides, then such a person must be taking up one side. This just shows how alien the principles of liberty and justice have become to us.

Someone might say that nefarious people like me are rushing to Patterson’s defense because we are worried about the precedent of punishing church leaders who enable abuse. Could be, I suppose. Or perhaps we might say that innocent people like me are worried about the precedent of punishing political enemies as a result of a mob-inspired bum’s rush. Could be that too. Just speculating here.

So biblically speaking, the person who wants to weigh both sides is actually defending the processes of justice first, and the accused second. The first defendant in every trial is justice herself. Whenever anyone is accused, guilty or not, the standards of justice are always on trial as well. In every trial the rule of law is also in the dock. A guilty person could be condemned (by sheer luck), and at the same time—if the process was a travesty—innocent justice might be condemned at the same time. Not all victims of lynching were falsely accused of whatever it was—but they were all falsely (and wickedly) treated. If due process is not followed, then you are stringing up justice right alongside a guilty man.

So in a situation like this one, what does Scripture require of us?

“Against an elder receive not an accusation, but before two or three witnesses. Them that sin rebuke before all, that others also may fear. I charge thee before God, and the Lord Jesus Christ, and the elect angels, that thou observe these things without preferring one before another, doing nothing by partiality” (1 Tim. 5:19–21).

The first thing is this. We are not supposed to even entertain an accusation against an elder (and Paige Patterson certainly fits this description) unless there is independent confirmation of the accusation. The charge needs to be clear—clear enough that different people can know they are talking about the same thing. Is the charge corroborated? The board said that they had a student record that contradicted an earlier statement by Patterson. Was the content of that record independently corroborated?

The second requirement from this passage is also plain. If there is independent confirmation of the accusation, then an elder can be and should be rebuked, and it should be public—in the presence of all. The reason it needs to be public is that powerful Christian leaders do require accountability. This really is true. In addition, this is also a way of getting men in powerful positions to walk circumspectly. If you strike a fool, the simple do learn wisdom (Prov. 21:11). The requirement of following due process with accusations against elders, followed up by dealing with the offense publicly if the guilt is established, is God’s appointed means for keeping moral order among leaders.

The third thing is this, and I am quite sure the apostle would have written this part with day-glo fluorescent pens, had that technology been available to him.

The third part is that all things must be done without partiality. But notice that refusal to accept a charge against an elder is fully consistent with doing all things without partiality. What this means is that there is to be no partiality between small and great, which means that there must be partiality between accused and accuser. When you reverse this—as our wicked generation most certainly wants to do—and remove partiality between accused and accuser, where accusation online can equal conviction, thus flushing centuries of progress in jurisprudence, you will (depend upon it) wind up with a system that shows partiality between small and great, the very thing Scripture prohibits. If you think I am writing about these things for no particular reason, then my heart really goes out to those children who will be born into the world you are trying to build.

To repeat, to show partiality between accuser and accused is the biblical way to maintain and protect the lack of partiality that any true system of justice will insist upon.

The ancient Romans often did not live up to their standard, but at least they had a reasonable standard. In this respect, many online justicey Christians have sunk beneath the level of the pagans.

“To whom I answered, It is not the manner of the Romans to deliver any man to die, before that he which is accused have the accusers face to face, and have licence to answer for himself concerning the crime laid against him” (Acts 25:16).

So, Two or Three Questions

Given how this thing has staggered somewhat drunkenly into public view, I do have three questions that I believe the authorities responsible for making this decision about Patterson really need to answer.

The first question is this. Given that the firing of Dr. Patterson was done, um, expeditiously, while he was traveling abroad, and that he was in effect “locked out” of his position, can the board of the seminary guarantee that he will have full access to any and all files that used to be in his possession, as that information might be used by him in crafting a response or defense? Will his access to the materials for his defense be restricted and impeded in any way?

My second question is this. Can the board assure us that the public pressure that was mounted against them did not affect their processes at all? By this I mean, the speed of deliberation, the specific actions that were taken, and the processes that were followed. Mobs have assembled outside courtrooms for centuries, and they do this because it frequently works. Can the board assure us that they acted on the basis of corroborated evidence alone, and that the presence of the outside pressure was a complete irrelevance?

The third question is this. The word abuse has a broad range of meaning. In your statement, you said this:

“Further, the Seminary stands against all forms of abuse and grieves for individuals wounded by abuse. Today, Dr. Bingham made it clear that SWBTS denounces all abusive behavior, any behavior that enables abuse, any failure to protect the abused and any failure to safeguard those who are vulnerable to abuse. Additionally, Dr. Bingham called for the SWBTS community to join the Body of Christ in praying for healing for all individuals affected by abuse.”

What, specifically, do you mean by “abuse,” and what, specifically, do you mean by “enables abuse”? Clearly Dr. Patterson was in view here as an enabler of abuse, but what are the precise boundaries of this enabling? Is it enabling abuse to encourage someone to stick it out in a troubled marriage? Given that you cited the enabling of abuse as your reason for terminating Dr. Patterson, could you please supply us with your definition of abuse, and your definition of enabling?

So there we go. Just three basic questions.

33
Leave a Reply

avatar
 
11 Comment threads
22 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
16 Comment authors
Steve in TorontoTubalcainFarinataJP Stewartbethyada Recent comment authors

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
JP Stewart
Member
JP Stewart

“The burden of proof is on the accuser.”

It should be, but not in the age of #metoo. In fact, some Christians seem to be replacing the Father, Son and Holy Ghost with #metoo, #nevertrump* and the Washington Post. As for links, I put Colter’s blog on the last commentable post along with Janet Mefferd’s podcast. She’s covering both this and Revoice conference.
https://afr.net/podcasts/janet-mefferd-live/2018/may/latest-developments-regarding-dr-paige-patterson-updates-on-the-gay-christianity-revoice-conference/

* Or #nevermoore, #neverpatterson, etc.

Armin
Guest
Armin

“One of the sins of our very muddled age is the sin of believing that if someone insists upon hearing both sides, then such a person must be taking up one side. This just shows how alien the principles of liberty and justice have become to us.” Actually, it IS taking up one side – the side of those who care about truth and fairness. The cosmopolitan elites (both inside and outside of reformed evangelicalism) who prioritize their own identity-based interests over the truth see any call for objectivity and impartiality as an expression of the prevailing attitudes of the… Read more »

Nathan Smith
Member

It makes no sense to me why Paige Patterson would be responsible for reporting a rape instead of the rape victim. Is this something that is legally binding upon him? Does it seem ethically binding to anyone else? It would seem to me that the rape victim would be responsible to report the rape if she decided to and would be allowed not to report it and that also would be her decision. That said, from reading the wordpress article that is linked in Pastor Wilson’s article, it seems to be a point of argument whether the rape actually even… Read more »

Arwenb
Guest
Arwenb

It makes no sense to me why Paige Patterson would be responsible for reporting a rape instead of the rape victim. As far as I know that would be a Title IX thing, i.e. all employees of a university are mandatory reporters. Which means that a university will often advise its employees, if the employee thinks that a student or coworker is about to tell them of an incident of sexual harassment or assault, to stop the person and warn them “I’m a mandatory reporter, and I am obligated to tell the university of any incidents of misconduct that I… Read more »

Nathan Smith
Member

The Title IX thing is something that I hadn’t thought of. SEBTS doesn’t currently accept federal funds and Title IX doesn’t apply to it, but I don’t know if that was different in 2003. I doubt it though. I doubt Patterson would have allowed it.

It doesn’t seem to me like it would be an ethical requirement unless the perpetrator had threatened the victim not to report. That doesn’t seem to be the case from anything that I have read, even the stuff that SEEMS slanderous.

Steve in Toronto
Guest
Steve in Toronto

SEBTS does accept federal funds in the form aid for students that are veterans

bethyada
Member

There is also Patterson’s press release at Southwestern.

JohnM
Guest
JohnM

Thanks, bethyada, for providing that.

Carson Spratt
Member

Slight grammar correction: you said “What this means is that there is to be no partiality between small and great, which means that there must be partiality between accused and accuser.” I think the second half of the sentence is missing a negation.

-BJ-
Guest
-BJ-

Actually, there is no grammar error. Doug is saying that for there to be no partiality on one side of the equation, there is of necessity partiality on the other side.

The question is where do we place partiality to be in line with biblical commands.

Doug is arguing that partiality must exist for the accused in order to be in line with the biblical command to not be partial toward either great or small.

Carson Spratt
Member

Oops. You’re right. I guess I don’t quite understand his point, then.

So, Doug: what does partiality between accused and accuser look like? Shouldn’t you hear them both equally, i.e. without partiality?

bethyada
Member

I think he means presumption of innocence until proven guilty. That is you need proof of fault against the accused to side with the accuser.

Though the judge can still hold a disinterested position which asks questions of both sides.

Carson Spratt
Member

Aha, that makes more sense. Thanks for clarifying.

Josh Hanna
Guest
Josh Hanna

Yes. I am not sure that partiality is the best term to use. Giving an accused the presumption of innocence does not mean taking sides with the accused. It also does not mean presuming that an accusation is false. It simply means that society treats the accused as innocent, even in the face of an accusation, until the accused is formally proven guilty by proper process. As bethyada points out, the appropriate position is “disinterested” impartiality until such a time as a complaint is proved.

Ken B
Guest
Ken B

Steve Hays of Triablogue fame has an interesting piece on this: http://triablogue.blogspot.com/2018/06/time-to-call-exterminator.html He says in the comments that he has information he is not at liberty to disclose, which is why he is so down on Patterson. Regarding the internet lynch mobs, I have observed these for many years, and used to comment on one until the pack turned on me. They are right to call out sin in leaders, and this might not be necessary if male leaders actually did this themselves, but I think Paul would say today to these women (they are overwhelmingly female) that “Besides that,… Read more »

Farinata
Guest
Farinata

Hays’ intervention is grossly dishonorable. “I can’t reveal any of the the incriminating details that I know about, so let me just drop some hints that they are REALLY juicy and scandalous. If you knew what I know, you would agree that the bum needed to get thrown out.” Look, if you want to accuse a guy of something, then do it in public with specifics. If you aren’t allowed to do that, then keep your trap shut. It is not a compromise to insinuate vague rumors that no-one can falsify. Seriously, I don’t have the first idea about Paige… Read more »

JP Stewart
Member
JP Stewart

I agree, Farinata. Others, like Robert Gagnon (a Patterson supporter), have mentioned rumors that another bombshell may be released in the Washington Post (what a Biblical way to sort this out, but I digress…). But he doesn’t seem to know the details. Even if he did, there’s no point gloating about clickbaity inside information you can’t release yet.

Ken B
Guest
Ken B

Hi Farinata Reading somewhat between the lines, it appears Hays may have received credible information from people who are too scared to go public with it for fear of the repurcussions. I think he should have said this up front though. I was more interested in his points about how the failure of celebrity/well-known Christian leaders to keep each other accountable does so much damage. The egalitarian camp really are milking this for all its worth, seeing it as yet again male leadership failing. Literally an old boys’ network. However, complementarians have got to be careful not to be seen… Read more »

Farinata
Guest
Farinata

But of course, since the SBC has tried and convicted Patterson by innuendo, there is no accountability. Getting fired so that the board can demonstrate its feminist piety is not any kind of Christian accountability.

Of course, sure, perhaps there is more to the story. But regardless, it’s dishonorable to traffic in ill rumors, even if some of them concern people who are actually bad. Hays should be ashamed of himself.

Ryan Sather
Guest
Ryan Sather

One note: this isn’t as clean as “accused” and “accuser”. In this instance, the one you place as “accuser” was “accused” herself (and punished with probation). From the accounts, she was placed in a position where those in power had her by herself to testify about what happened. It actually seems the thing you are concerned with happening to PP actually happened to the woman who was raped, and then held as an “accused” without the protections in place that should be there for the “accused”. Also, did the seminary actually state that PP was fired for “enabling abuse”? I… Read more »

JP Stewart
Member
JP Stewart

Anyone who doubts the SJW influence in the SBC should read this:
https://sbcvoices.com/voting-greear-could-as-easily-vote-hemphill-tempted-to-nominate-beth-moore-for-sbc-presidency/

This SBC “mover and shaker” (and Hillary voter) is seriously considering the nomination of Beth Moore as the next denominational president. He’s the same guy who came up with last year’s resolution to condemn the alt-right. In the current environment, roving bands of angry teletubbies are more of a threat to the SBC than the alt-right.

Steve in Toronto
Guest
Steve in Toronto

What on earth is wrong with condemning the alt-right?

JP Stewart
Member
JP Stewart

“What on earth is wrong with condemning the alt-right?”

As I said, they’re a non-threat to the SBC. It was a political move, nothing else. The SBC now has cultural Marxists, “celibate” LGBT proponents, race hustlers and various other identity politics swirling around everywhere…and they condemn something that not a single seminary professor or prominent pastor is promoting. If they condemned the alt-left as well, that would be better, but they were silent about the progressives within and without their denomination.

Steve in Toronto
Guest
Steve in Toronto

the alt right is a real threat to the SBC witness. the alt left is not. Lots of people inside the SBC look to outsiders (and some insiders) as at best “useful idiots” to the Alt Right and at worst like “fellow travelers”.

Steve in Toronto
Guest
Steve in Toronto

We are talking about a employment dispute here. Dr. Patterson is not entitled to the same level of due process he would be if he were being charged with a crime. Keep in mind 1 Timothy 3:2, can anyone around here honestly say that Dr.Patterson is “above reproach”?

JP Stewart
Member
JP Stewart

“We are talking about a employment dispute here. Dr. Patterson is not entitled to the same level of due process he would be if he were being charged with a crime. ” So we can just let the online watchblog lynch mob take over and practically fire him overnight? I guess we just throw out Prov. 18:17 and Matt. 18…especially if the Washington Post is on our side. “Keep in mind 1 Timothy 3:2, can anyone around here honestly say that Dr.Patterson is “above reproach”?” I wasn’t aware that Patterson is a bishop/elder, but if “above reproach” is our criterion,… Read more »

bethyada
Member

But that is exactly what Doug is saying. The fact he is an elder means that we should be more circumspect about accusations. Conversely, if they are proven true, the punishment is greater.

Steve in Toronto
Guest
Steve in Toronto

It is impossible to conclude that Dr. Patterson is now “above reproach”.

Andrew Lohr
Member

“Due process,” yeah, but not everything that goes on in US and state courts, or in college courts, or even in church courts and gets called ” due process” helps find out the truth and deal with what is found out. “Due process” does not mean exactly whatever legal technicalities are in force at the moment. Thank God there’s significant overlap; but our courts could work better: better at finding and facing facts, and better at doing justice once the facts are found. And I’m not sure accused-and-not-convicted calls for treating the same as innocent-as-the-driven-snow. (Not sure Doug is saying… Read more »

Tubalcain
Guest

As a most likely unwelcome outsider looking in, (I’m an Eastern Orthodox/Antiochian Orthodox Christian), I’m puzzled that a long time revered and respected clergyman and seminary professor in the largest Protestant denomination has been let go, and under such questionable circumstances, and with wishy-washy evidence at best. I have no dog in this fight, but I can only surmise that the board at SWBTS capitulated to a vocal SJW and feminist lynch mob calling for Dr. Patterson’s head. IMHO, The SBC, and apparently some of its churches, leadership, and clergy, like other evangelical Protestants, are becoming more feminized. We had… Read more »

JP Stewart
Member
JP Stewart

I’d say your 100% spot-on, Tubalcain. Since you’re Orthodox, what’s your take on Brother Nathanael? I don’t know much about him–I just watched one of his Youtube videos.
http://brothernathanaelfoundation.org/

Tubalcain
Guest

Im not familiar with him, J.P. I would, however, recommend YouTube videos by Fr. Josiah Trenham. Fr. Josiah is an Antiochian Orthodox priest, and pastor of St. Andrew Antiochian Orthodox Church in Riverside, CA. Excellent lectures on the LGBT agenda, etc.