Letters Over the Transom

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Hollow Soul Bullets

I do believe this is one of the finest commentaries on the issues surrounding the ongoing epidemic of public school shootings that I have been privileged to read. I must, once again, briefly comment on the links included in your post. When I saw the one highlighted as “as common and uncontroversial as microwave ownership,” my first thought was, “when microwaves are outlawed, only men who can’t cook . . . oops, I mean only outlaws will have microwaves.” I was surprised that the link did not lead to a tinfoil hat movement to have such dangerous items as microwaves outlawed. However the linked-to Crosspolitic article by Toby Sumpter was excellent, and even momentarily caused me to wonder if you (Pastor Wilson) were moon-lighting under a pen name. Sad to say though, I do feel that in order to stop the bloodshed in our public schools, it is high time for all men of good moral character to finally admit that we need to break down and do something we might find distasteful; that is to lend our voices to the call to once and for all ban . . . all public schools.

Lee

Lee, thank you. And Toby is his own entity entirely.

Excellent article! I do not know anything about you, other than I have disagreed with you about 100% on previous articles I’ve seen . . . The only time I have seen your site is when some radical anti-Trump blog links to your site because you have some article that is against Trump. On this particular topic I agree with you completely. Well stated.

Sheila

Sheila, thank you. I would invite you to stick around—you might be surprised more than just occasionally.

Two Humanities

While I whole-heartedly agree with what you say, I’m reminded of my classes that talk much of who all cultures come from God and we should look for what there is to affirm in every culture. In fact, one resource we read went so far as to say if we don’t find things to affirm in every culture we have made an idol out of our own culture. This was also used for culture as a whole, that the cultural mandate combined with a certain reading of Acts 17 and Philippians 4:8 that teaches us we need to look for the good in the sinful culture and tell the gospel in those terms. I suppose I’m not arguing, I’m deeply curious. Do these types of missional strategies at some level of practice, whatever they say in theory, deny the antithesis between the two peoples? It seems they are looking at the people of the world and believing that they are a mix of people of God and people of Satan, and searching hard for what there is to admire. Can you help me out? Are these two views incompatible? It seems like the push to find good in every culture is a full frontal denial of the two humanities, at least the way I have seen it practiced. And it rests not on explicit texts but on examples that could be interpreted many other ways. These are the same people that insist we need to listen to the children of Satan for a long time before we have anything to say to them. Do these two things go together? Or is there a denial, in practice, of the two humanities functioning in the Reformed world today?

Luke

Luke, the tendency to treat all cultures as though they were on all fours together is well-intentioned, in that it does not want to give way to thoughtless jingoism, or some mindless identification of one particular culture with the kingdom of God—a mistake that has been made more than once. But at the same time, this move amounts to a confused confession that the kingdom of God is impotent in history, and that sanctification cannot happen to tribes or nations. And this is radically false. No one in their own nature is superior to anyone else—we are all by nature objects of wrath. But can one culture be superior to another? Absolutely, yes. And when it happens, it is entirely the grace of God mediated through the gospel. This is just another way of saying that the transforming gospel got to certain cultures first.

Creeping Pluralism at Mablog?

Regarding the analogy of Elijah and the ACLU Lawyers regarding which God would produce a more free and tolerant society (from your brief quote from Empires of Dirt): Given that the “tolerance” shown to the prophets of Baal in the original episode involved Elijah mocking them, arresting them, and then slaughtering them, I struggle to see the application of Elijah’s method of practicing the true faith with a “free and tolerant society.” I dare say many ACLU Lawyers might think that their own methods, however problematic, might still result in a society they would perceive as more free and tolerant than what was exhibited by Elijah during this event? Might you further clarify?

Daniel

Daniel, quite a reasonable question. I believe the showdown on Mt. Carmel was, in effect, a proxy war, thwarting a coup, and the leaders of the defeated army were executed. I don’t believe that Elijah was modeling for us how we should handle church/synagogue relations. It was closer to what we did to Saddam Hussein, or Osama. And that kind of decisive action paves the way for peace.

Reverend Wilson, Can you please give us your biblical basis for this? I just have a hard time finding any justification in Scripture for the magistrate to establish a pluralistic society if Christ is truly King. Thank you for your work on this site.

Kilgore

Kilgore, I believe that the idea of a pluralistic society is incoherent. So I don’t want tolerance for unbelievers because they should have an equal voice in running our society. I want tolerance for them because this is what I believe the law of Christ requires. In an ideal biblical republic, church bells would be legal and encouraged and broadcasted calls to prayer from minarets would not be. The public space belongs to Jesus. But unbelievers would not be persecuted for their beliefs—not because secularism requires it but rather because our marching orders in the New Testament require it.

Insanity on Stilts

A little off topic (but this is all related, isn’t it?), but I’d love to hear your reflection on this, which I’m assuming you predicted at some point in the past.

Andy

Andy, see below.

Having read your stuff for a few years now I have an inclination as to how you’d respond to this type of insanity — but I’d really appreciate a response that focused on what a fundamentalist Christian like myself should do when the federales come knocking on my door to drag my kids/wife/confused dog away. Being a combat vet I’m inclined to respond with hot lead, but I’m not exactly sure that’s what Jesus would do. I really do struggle with the appropriate response (there’s not a lot of jelly in my evangelicalism—probably a little too much spit and vinegar actually.) As I wait to finish the tunnel under my house that leads to a cabin the middle of nowhere Montana I’m convinced that it’s only a matter of time before I’m faced with one of these do or die decisions. Any advice you can offer would be greatly appreciated.

Tim

Tim, the one thing I can say is that standing by and watching while your family is hauled off should not be one of the options. Fighting them is essential, but I would also say that it is crucial to fight with wisdom. And the fact that these parents are fighting to prevent the use of transgender drugs on their daughter, which she apparently wants, means that there is some kind of parenting fail involved already. But the fact that they should have been fighting sooner does not mean that they should not fight now.

Six Day Stuff

In the third reason given in the post on 6-day creation, the author says “For the bookends of creation to match, they must be mirrors of each other.” How does Gehenna and the eternal, created souls in Hell fit into this scheme? Are they considered no longer part of creation (an Augustinian sort of decreation)? Otherwise, I’m not sure that this argument really helps the position. Cheers,

Ty

Ty, I am inclined to the view that Lewis suggested at the end of The Great Divorce, that being the idea that Hell and damnation are eternally serious for the souls involved, but collectively they approach a cosmological nullity. Hell is only immense on the inside, for those on the inside.

50 Shades of Feminist Inconsistency

Bravo! It always amused me how Pastors always addressed male sexual sin (rightly so) but hardly ever female. In fact most pastors assume females do not sin and always want to be Godly . . . the irony of this whole situation is hilarious! Women who hate male authority going to watch a sex movie about a woman totally subordinate to a man . . .

Charles

Charles, as I have often said in other contexts, if it made sense, it wouldn’t be sin.

Is It Lust to Have Eyes in Your Head?

Have you heard the argument that Christians have taken the fight against lust too far because of a mistranslation or misunderstanding in Matthew 5:28? The idea is that the Greek word is more properly translated “covet” instead of “lust.” The argument centers on the idea that lust is the hunger, covetousness is the plan to satiate the hunger. So instead of having it viewed as wrong to have the hunger, the sin is not when you recognize that a woman is attractive, but when you start trying to figure out how to seduce her. One point they make is that when the Jewish sages who translated the Septuagint translated the Ten Commandments, they used this word in Exodus 20:17. Now, I fully admit that our culture is too sexualized, and that we are to flee sexual immorality. But Matthew 5:28 has been used to metaphorically beat young men over the head with “If you see a woman as sexually desirable, you have sinned.” Which, in the struggle to be sanctified, is a massive obstacle. What are your thoughts?

Roger

Roger, yes, I have heard that line of argument. I haven’t done any detailed work on the words involved, but I do believe that some have taken the Lord’s teaching against heart sin too far. That said, the Tenth Commandment prohibited coveting your neighbor’s wife, which obviously means that sex is entailed in that prohibition as well. There are ways of parsing this that are nothing but self-justification (“what I was doing in my head was okay because I wasn’t totally aroused”) and there are ways of analyzing it that are just plain common sense (e.g. knowing that a woman is attractive is not the same thing as being attracted).

Re: Lust Monkeys Well, yes, of course. We’ve erected enormous Asherah Poles all over our landscape and now we’re astounded to find that the temple prostitutes are talking about forming a union to lobby for better working conditions and more respect. If you keep chopping down those poles and sacrificing bulls on them, (yes, the seven year-old bull in your father’s pasture) the townsfolk are sure to gather and call for your demise, Pastor Jerub-Baal.

Dan

Dan, I get what you are saying. Perhaps we should do it at night.

Banana Republican?

“But I care more about our entire process not being corrupted, and the politicalization of the judiciary would be one such corruption that I don’t want to see.” Doug, how can a man of your perception fail to grasp that the judiciary, from the Supreme Court all the way down, is already as comprehensively politicized as may be conceived? The “Wise Latina” or RBG objective, fair or constitutionally-directed in any matter at all? PLEASE! No further judicial corruption is possible without declaring the U.S. a banana republic. I believe if the small things are done right (i.e., hanging Hillary from a lamppost) and a little bit of godly fear is instilled in the troublers of the nation, there is a small chance the larger issues may eventually be put in order. Failing that, we’re looking at civil war and/or partitioning the country, I think.

Tom

Tom, I agree with you that our differences are looking increasingly intractable, and the Balkanization of our country is a real possibility. But I differ with you about this—that our judiciary “is already as comprehensively politicized as may be conceived.” I agree with you that it is bad, but I think I differ in this—we are still a good way from the bottom. It can get lots worse.

Stoning? Seriously?

Do you even care that there are real live Christian men writing to you to about stoning women to death?

Gabrielle

Gabrielle, I could be wrong about this, but I took “Avery” as a woman’s name. The questions about stoning do not proceed from misogyny at all. Achan was stoned, and he was a man. These questions are obviously presented to anyone who says that we must turn away from secular law and come back to biblical law. Since that is something I have been arguing for, it is a natural question to ask what I propose to do with the Old Testament regulations that we find somewhat draconian.

Charity on a Curve

I am not referring to any post in particular, but I do have a question. In the university that I am in, I am graded on a bell-curve. The system is designed such that being better than the person next to you is more crucial than to simply “do well.” Doing well is measured against other people. If I put in the effort to make good notes (or anything that gives me an advantage), is it my duty as a Christian to share them? Or should I view this environment as a competition, thereby engaging in this in a different way (no one expects a runner to pull an opponent pass the finishing line in race). I suppose the difficulty is knowing that helping the other person directly affects how I might do in the module. Thank you very much!

Shawn

Shawn, I would encourage you to share with and encourage others. The analogy is not quite that of a race, where there is only one first place. If the professor said that he was going to give out only one A, then it might be closer to an actual competition. Or if you were taking a test that would land you a paid position, no one would look for or expect that kind of help.

The Riot and the Dance

Delighting in creation is the key. One of the turning points in the development of evolution is when its popularizers (like Sagan) began to speak about the world in terms of wonder and amazement. I know many did this before, but people focus less on the facts and evidence when the salesman are giving them an experience and not a science quiz. I am excited about this documentary and the effects it might have on a generation of young believers. Hopefully it will inspire them to find wonder and amazement in God’s world again. I wish more Christians (ministers and otherwise) would try to spark an imagination about God’s world again.

BJ

BJ, yes. We must be, in the first instance, believers who are delighted in the works of God. We must be, in the second instance, capable of answering the claims of evolutionists. But if we skip the first, we run the risk of becoming argumentative cranks. This movie is spectacular in how it celebrates creation.

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Bryce
Bryce
3 years ago

“Unbelievers would not be persecuted for their beliefs—not because secularism requires it but rather because our marching orders in the New Testament require it.” This must be the right answer, but I thought Kilgore was asking (as I am, too) where you would go specifically in the Bible to show that a Christian magistrate would not punish non-Christians. This is really one of the most important issues I think to win over Christians who may be on the fence about biblical theocracy. Under Israel’s administration, idolaters were put to death (Exodus 22:20). What exactly are the NT “marching orders” that… Read more »

Dave W
Dave W
3 years ago
Reply to  Bryce

I’ve wanted to hear Doug’s answer on this one for a while, as well. Sure looks to me that consulting Moses’ Law on how to organize our society must result in prohibition of active worship of other gods. The closest thing I see to religious tolerance is that aliens in Israel were free not to worship Yahweh, though still they were not free to worship other gods. I hope Doug will talk about this soon.

bethyada
bethyada
3 years ago
Reply to  Bryce

Under the old covenant, mixing with foreigners was prohibited in part because of the Messiah’s line. The Jews had to be faithful to Yahweh.

Since Christ we are to evangelise men. God had overlooked their idolatry but they need to repent.

So there is reason to prohibit idolatry for the Israelites pre-Christ. This reason does not apply to all Gentiles post Christ such that they need to be executed for idolatry. Persuasion with the work of the Spirit is the way that we bring men into the kingdom.

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Bryce

I am not sure what the goal of such punishment would be. Would it apply to US citizens who attend Buddhist or Hindu temples, Jews who pray at synagogues, and Muslims who worship at mosques? Would it apply to Christians whose worship practices strike dominionists as possibly idolatrous? Would it result in anomalies such as the pious Jew being executed for openly practicing his religion while the atheist is left alone? Generally the persecution of minority religions has not stamped them out but has driven them underground. This makes me wonder if the purpose of prohibiting Hindu worship is not… Read more »

adad0
3 years ago
Reply to  Jill Smith

Jilly, our predecessors worked all this out during the English Civil war. Which is why the American Puritans eventually came up with separation of church and state.
“Controlling religions is like herding cats AND cat ladies! ????????

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  adad0

Your last sentence makes it impossible for me not to link to my favorite commercial:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTwJzTsb2QQ

John Callaghan
John Callaghan
3 years ago
Reply to  Jill Smith

The first sentence prompts me to link to this commercial for one of my favorite things when I was younger:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtauzd3KZGI

John Callaghan
John Callaghan
3 years ago
Reply to  John Callaghan

The English have long had the wittiest commercials, but for shear weirdness, nothing beats a good Japanese one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_iDfoy1v5g

Watch it without the closed captions first. The closed captions do make it even funnier – but no more comprehensible.

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  John Callaghan

Fabulous!

Ellen
Ellen
3 years ago

This is related to none of the above but I cannot find a contact to address my technical problem. I have an iPad and, using the app, when I try to scroll down to an older blog it takes on a life of its own and scrolls through old posts at such a pace that I can never find the one I want. This is very frustrating. Does this happen to anyone else? I would like some tech support on this if possible. I recently got a newer, not the latest, iPad. Help…please?

adad0
3 years ago
Reply to  Ellen

I think Steve Jobs wrote a program to annoy you personally! ????.

(Otherwise I don’t know!)

Shawn
Shawn
3 years ago
Reply to  Ellen

Hi Ellen – thanks for the feedback. The scroll feature is ‘jumpy’ because it has to batch load posts as you continue to scroll. However, if you scroll slowly, it should be possible to keep track of where you’re at (although it certainly isn’t seamless!) Ultimately the best way to find an old post would be to use the ‘search’ option in the app. Another option would be to simply pull up dougwils.com on the Safari browser.

OKRickety
OKRickety
3 years ago
Reply to  Shawn

Shawn, I don’t use the app (I have no Apple products) but when I look at the 3 reviews I can see on iTunes, Ellen’s complaint seems to be on par with them. In other words, I think the app has a problem and, as a software developer of over 25 years, I suggest you accept the feedback of those reviewers and work to fix it.

Malik
Malik
3 years ago

Jill- I didn’t see your comment last week until the comments were closed. I definitely find spell check very helpful, but it can only help so much even on a computer. Being dyslexic I’ll mix up B and D’s and things like that. I also mix up vowels a lot, so sometimes spell check can’t help. On my phone it’s just useless because the keyboard is ready to use all the languages saved, while on a computer you switch around language by language.

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Malik

Malik, I am sure it must be difficult. I personally have zero spatial awareness. None. Zilch. Nada. When I am asked to mentally rotate an object, the relevant part of my brain is as dark as North Korea after sundown. That has given me sympathy because at least I don’t have to cope with rotating objects every day! Was your school helpful in teaching you strategies?

Malik
Malik
3 years ago
Reply to  Jill Smith

Yeah, it can be irritating, but it’s not terrible. My school didn’t teach me any strategies, I went to a pretty small school and they didn’t have any programs or teachers with any expirience in that field.

bethyada
bethyada
3 years ago

I think Doug and some of the commenters here may find this article of use: https://www.9marks.org/article/a-word-of-empathy-warning-and-counsel-for-narrow-complementarians/

He makes some good points whatever your perspective. By “patriarchy” I suspect he means toxic patriarchy.

bethyada
bethyada
3 years ago

So I just listened to your Sheologians interview. While it was generally irrelevant to the topic I was impressed with the food pairings. The ones mentioned were Steak and butter Bacon and eggs Coffee and dark chocolate Beets and feta. Approval of all these. I have blue cheese and butter blend that melts particularly well on filet steak. though that may depend on whether you like blue cheese. But the French are correct in that butter makes everything better. I have two beet and feta salads that I make, both which are quite popular among food snob millennials. I would… Read more »

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  bethyada

Coffee, dark chocolate, and crusty French bread.

kyriosity
kyriosity
3 years ago
Reply to  bethyada

I was thinking coconut, dark chocolate, and almonds…if a triad counts as a pairing.

Although if Summer were to ask me the question, I think the wickedest possible answer I could give her would be… pineapple and pizza. ????

bethyada
bethyada
3 years ago
Reply to  kyriosity

Of course, bread and wine is always a winner.

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  bethyada

I would trade the wine for creme fraiche et un pot au chocolat, served to me in a bistro on the Left Bank, in the shadow of Notre Dame de Paris. Those were my glory days! I went to confession at Notre Dame, relying on my schoolgirl French and the helpful Instant Translater Sin Card thoughtfully provided in the racks outside the confessional. It sounded far more exotic in French, “I had sinful thoughts” becoming “J’ai eu des pensees sensuelles”! The penance was a bit stiff so he may have thought “daydreaming in church”was more like “mentally plotted against the… Read more »

Ellen
Ellen
3 years ago

Doug, I’m not sure if it is the wovax app. How do I know? It’s got the barking dog on it. And, Shawn, if I simply touch to move to a different blog post, it goes crazy and jumps down too far. When I touch to try to ‘catch’ what I was looking for, it jumps way down again. It is impossible for me to scroll slowly. I suppose the best solution is to go to the website via safari. I thought, though, that this might not be MY problem and that you would want to be aware of it.… Read more »

Matt Mitchell
Matt Mitchell
3 years ago

Ellen, the app has always done that since I’ve used it whether iPad or iPhone. I just just deselect to make it go to the top but you’re right you move it much and it scrolls down a week or so.

Ellen
Ellen
3 years ago

Thanks, Matt. That’s good to know and probably good for the tech staff to know. I never used the app on my old iPad because it could not support it. Now I don’t even want to use the app because of this issue.

JP Stewart
JP Stewart
3 years ago

“It always amused me how Pastors always addressed male sexual sin (rightly so) but hardly ever female. In fact most pastors assume females do not sin and always want to be Godly”

The guy who wrote this (Charles) should’ve seen the comment section here a few months ago…
Update: “Gabrielle” = a former commenter who went by a certain duplicate pronoun on here…at least according to her blog.

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  JP Stewart

Orwell had it wrong. It should have been XX good, XY bad!

OKRickety
OKRickety
3 years ago

Gabrielle said: “Do you even care that there are real live Christian men writing to you to about stoning women to death?” Well, I could be wrong about this, but I think Doug missed the real point of the question. I think it was actually this: Gabrielle believes there are many “Christian” men who believe that women are generally sub-human, so much so that stoning them to death would be acceptable. She decided that Avery’s question was supporting this idea and that it should be met with vociferous condemnation. Since Doug failed to do this, she believes that he is,… Read more »

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  OKRickety

I knew that ME’s real name is Gabrielle but of course I kept that to myself. On her blog today, she goes public with her name but also with a very strange accusation that Doug stole her name in writing his series of letters to a broken girl. It was very odd indeed.

bethyada
bethyada
3 years ago
Reply to  Jill Smith

I picked up her name was Gabrielle also, but only after the letters started. Provenance?

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  bethyada

Yours must have been intuition! Mine was that someone who replied to her posts called her Gabrielle and I remembered because it is such a pretty name. But I simply can’t imagine thinking that Doug used her name to steal her identity as an abuse victim after she challenged him for being insensitive, which is what she is claiming: “In response he took my words to him, and stole my very name, and basically just converted me into a fictional character now available as an ebook. Seriously??? Yep. You can buy the whole titillating tale of the girl suffering child… Read more »

kyriosity
kyriosity
3 years ago
Reply to  Jill Smith

???????????? “Doug stole her name…” Oh my word, somebody thinks highly of herself!

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  kyriosity

Is it too late to do a search and replace on the manuscript? I think that Dear Jillybean would be equally appealing and I cheerfully hand over the trademark rights!

kyriosity
kyriosity
3 years ago
Reply to  Jill Smith

????

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  kyriosity

My Snowflake is rocking out at a Billy Joel concert in Madison Square Gardens right now! My last rock concert is so long ago that Jerry Garcia was still alive. I am going to live vicariously by blasting Uptown Girl on my outdoor speakers!

soylentg
3 years ago
Reply to  kyriosity

Why do you suppose that the lyrics of an old song have suddenly invaded my mind: “you’re so vain, you probably think this song is about you…

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  soylentg

I am going after the authors of “Jack and Jill” with the full force of the law. I do not fetch my own water. I do not tumble down hills. I do not sneak off with boys and find myself in a horizontal position on the grass. And, if I ever did do those things in my more colorful past, they were not my fault, I was led up that hill by foul seducers with wicked intentions that did not necessarily involve buckets of water. Therefore the use of my name is outing and shaming me as a victim of… Read more »

Jane
Jane
3 years ago
Reply to  Jill Smith

You think Jills have it bad?

Sincerely,

The Plain Mrs. Doe

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Jane

Very true, Jane, but couple it with Smith!

I have pondered going back to my maiden name, which was prettier, but I know what is involved in replacing one’s alien registration card and it is quite horrendous. Even so, I was thinking it over when my ex-DH told me his fiancee expects me to to change back so that there won’t be two Mrs. Tom Smiths in this 20 million person multi-urban area. I said that once she has got rid of all the other Mrs Tom Smiths, I will get right on it!

kyriosity
kyriosity
3 years ago
Reply to  Jill Smith

Jill, you are on a roll today…but I think it’s an uphill one!

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  kyriosity

It is the Norco’s from having nine teeth removed last Friday!

OKRickety
OKRickety
3 years ago
Reply to  Jill Smith

You’ll notice that I did not mention the name of the commenter. I had not yet seen her blog post that you reference. In it, she said: “In response he took my words to him, and stole my very name, and basically just converted me into a fictional character now available as an ebook. Seriously??? Yep.” I never supposed that Letters to a Broken Girl  were based on her words. And “stole my very name”? That claim is bordering on insanity. But “Seriously??? Yep.” I greatly doubt it. @Douglas Wilson, is there any possibility that you chose the name Gabrielle… Read more »

JP Stewart
JP Stewart
3 years ago
Reply to  OKRickety

“Not surprisingly, the commenters at her blog buy her claim hook, line, and sinker. It sounds like the #metoo fad”

Maybe #memetoo will be the new Christian feminist blog fad?

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  JP Stewart

Nice one!

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  OKRickety

I am glad that Gabrielle finds support and affirmation on her blog. But, I find it troubling that she can speak uncandidly about Doug yet there is no way for her followers to hear a more balanced version of what she says. After the first few letters, she was one of the first to respond positively to Doug’s messages to the imaginary Gabrielle. She does not tell her readers this–that she knew from the very beginning that Doug’s scenario used a character who happened to share her name, and that she had no apparent problem with this. If she believed,… Read more »

JP Stewart
JP Stewart
3 years ago
Reply to  Jill Smith

“I am glad that Gabrielle finds support and affirmation on her blog.”

I’m not sure if her little echo chamber is a good thing. Her commenters buy into her self-portrayal as a calm, reasonable, gracious type. However, we know how she acted here. In fact, she attacked you (a Catholic with moderate political leanings) even more viciously than she did “red pill” and “patriarchal” types.

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  JP Stewart

JP, I agree that it might not be always be the wisest kind of support. Far better would be people who really like her, think she has good things to say, and are willing to challenge irrational statements. But part of me thinks that she is better off believing she has people who will support her no matter what.

OKRickety
OKRickety
3 years ago
Reply to  Jill Smith

Jill said: “… there is no way for her followers to hear a more balanced version of what she says.” But there is a way. She even provides the link to one of the Broken Girl posts. One commenter on the post says he “did go to his site to check out things.” However, as far as I can tell, they have the same reading comprehension that she herself displays. In other words, you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make it drink. I have tried on a few occasions to individually engage with some of the… Read more »

Jill Smith
Jill Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  OKRickety

Hi OK, I was thinking over what you said, and I think there are three things going on, and all of them can affect the Christian culture. The first is that, even if I thought the world of someone’s character, I would not agree with what he or she said if I thought it didn’t make sense or was factually wrong. I have noticed that on many religious boards hosted by women, people will express enthusiastic agreement with things that, if they think about them, don’t make a lot of sense. So, why do they do it? Is there a… Read more »

Jane
Jane
3 years ago
Reply to  OKRickety

“In other words, you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make it drink.”

Or the more contemporary version, “I can explain it to you, but I can’t understand it for you.”

kyriosity
kyriosity
3 years ago
Reply to  Jane

Or “You can lead a man to knowledge, but you can’t make him think.”

Justin Parris
Justin Parris
3 years ago
Reply to  kyriosity

When so many have been taught to mistake feeling for thinking, it’s quite the uphill journey.