Book of the Month/July 2020

Happy Fourth of July, and sorry this book-of-the-month selection is a few days late. May all your fireworks go off vertically, and not horizontally. May you and your household come to grasp how bad the House of Hanover was to the cause of liberty, and how good they were compared to our present regime.

As recent events have illustrated so dramatically, a lot of American Christians need to obtain a better grasp of our nation’s founding. There are many reasons for this, but here are two.

First, we need to understanding that the American Revolution was nothing at all like the French Revolution, and nothing at all like the current agitators, rioters, and antifa fascists. The American Revolution, as Burke saw, was a conservative resistance to statist encroachments on their rights as Englishmen. It was not revolutionary in the sense of wanting to burn it all down and to start from scratch. In other words, we need to know how to defend the War for Independence from below.

But we must also learn how to defend it from above, from our current handlers and rulers who want to pretend that the American experiment was secularist from the beginning. This is not anywhere close to being the case, as Mark Hall ably shows This book is crammed with citations from primary sources, and he proves, definitively, that America did indeed have a Christian founding.

I highly recommend this book. It is scholarly, but fully accessible. Hall is an academic, but–and this is high praise–he doesn’t write like one.

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Robert
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Robert

Can you recommend a good book about American and Indian history?

everett lunday
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Have you tried Wilderness Empire: A Narrative by Allen W. Eckert?

Christiana
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Christiana

The Great Plains by Walter Prescott Webb is a worthy read. You can look at it on archive.org where it is a free read (out of copyright).