The Answer to White Racism, White Fragility, Black Fragility, and Black Racism Is Always the Gospel

Some of you may not have seen this one. I have had a number of my blog posts on racism gathered into one e-book. You may click here, or on the cover below in order to get to the Mablog e-tail outlet. The cost is one clam for shipping and handling. You have no idea how many ones and zeros get knocked around during one of these purchases. It is available in Mobi, EPUB, and PDF.

And if anything in the title of this post offended you, you need to get the book.

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bethyada
Member

If you put them on Amazon we could order the tree version.

My Portion Forever
Member

For [Christ] himself is our peace, who has made the two groups one and has destroyed the barrier, the dividing wall of hostility, by setting aside in his flesh the law with its commands and regulations. His purpose was to create in himself one new humanity out of the two, thus making peace, and in one body to reconcile both of them to God through the cross, by which he put to death their hostility. He came and preached peace to you who were far away and peace to those who were near. For through him we both have access… Read more »

Tony
Guest
Tony

O great, another book about racism in America. Everyone wants a conversation about race, but only one side is allowed to speak. The other side is allowed to sit down and shut up.

kyriosity
Member

Considering that Pastor Wilson has repeatedly issued invitations to the “other side” to discuss this issue, and considering that he and Thabiti Anyabwile had a lengthy and productive written exchange a few years ago, your comment not so much misses the mark as finds there is no mark for it to miss.

bdash
Guest
bdash

yes cause Wilson represents everyone?!!!

Malik
Guest
Malik

Why do people try to dodge the issue every time it comes up.  Let me guess, you’re white, and probably never lived in the actual city.   White people are allowed to speak up, but they have very little to speak up about, it’s not like black cops are walking around killing innocent white teens.  People like you seem to just want to not talk about an area that you think isn’t a problem, or that you are part of the problem.   I have lived in STL for years, and I spend most of my time in the city,… Read more »

The Commenter Formerly Known As fp
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The Commenter Formerly Known As fp

Tell me, Malik: Is the 70% out-of-wedlock birthrate for blacks due to “crazy racism”?

Malik
Guest
Malik

The commenter Formerly known as fp- I don’t see your point, you haven’t even addressed anything I said. And you should really clarify you statement, because it sounds like you are saying that black people are inherently worse than white people, and I hope to God that that’s not what you’re trying to say.
Kyriosity- It was to Tony. I didn’t entirely understand what you meant with your comment, but I don’t think you were in disagreement with me.

The Commenter Formerly Known As fp
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The Commenter Formerly Known As fp

Malik, you said:

I don’t see your point, you haven’t even addressed anything I said. And you should really clarify you statement, because it sounds like you are saying that black people are inherently worse than white people…

Not my fault that you have issues with a simple, straightforward question. Instead of putting words into my mouth, why don’t you try answering my query?

Malik
Guest
Malik

You really don’t know very much about how to have a conversation. You ignored everything that I said, and then asked a seemingly irrelevant question. I asked for you to clarify the relevance, so I could answer your question. Because you seem to not want to do this, nor clarify what you mean by your question, I will answer it as best I can without the needed context. First let me expand on your lone statistic. White people in similar situations as black people have similar statistics. Now, is this statistic the fault of racism. Yes and no. First- No… Read more »

The Commenter Formerly Known As fp
Guest
The Commenter Formerly Known As fp

Malik, do you know what “out-of-wedlock” means?

Malik
Guest
Malik

Lol yeah, want me to give a graphic description or something? Do you just like to ask random questions with no point?

The Commenter Formerly Known As fp
Guest
The Commenter Formerly Known As fp

Malik, if you simply answered my questions, the conversation could move forward. When you toss out red herrings and blame “fathers going to jail when they are innocent, systemic poverty, the way the justice system is rigged against people of color” — all of which have nothing to do with marriage and childbirth rates — it makes me wonder if you understand simple concepts such as cause and effect. I’d be interested to hear you explain why the out-of-wedlock birth rates for blacks are higher after the passage of civil rights legislation than they were during the era of Jim… Read more »

Malik
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Malik

Sir, you truly are very terrible at civilized discourse, as well as lacking basic respect. Very well, those were not red herrings, my point was that you see these higher out of wedlock birth rate in lower income neighborhoods, and it is clear that when a father is gone the family unit has trouble functioning, and of course there is more chance of an out of wedlock child. Again, the black culture being stuck in poverty causes this higher rate among black people, and racism causes this equality divide. Now again, what so you think that this higher out of… Read more »

The Commenter Formerly Known As fp
Guest
The Commenter Formerly Known As fp

Malik, it is your contention that blacks are “oppressed” due to “systemic racism”, is it not? A simple “yes” or “no” will do.

Malik
Guest
Malik

Yes

Jane
Member

Malik, Kyriosity’s comment was also a response to Tony. Sometimes the replies are hard to follow in this format.

kyriosity
Member

Whoops. Sorry, Malik, I deleted my question and just now found your answer. Thanks for clarifying…it’s hard to follow the thread sometimes, especially on a phone when there aren’t as many indents. The point of my comment was to refute Tony’s assertion that Pastor Wilson wants to have a one-sided conversation.

Malik
Guest
Malik

Right, I got that, thanks:)

bdash
Guest
bdash

5000000 upvotes!

Clay Crouch
Guest
Clay Crouch

Yeah, but wait, this book is written by a fella who has assured us that racism isn’t what people of color think it is. You know like, southern chattel slavery was a boon to race relations!

mys
Guest
mys

I disagree with the notion that the gospel is the answer to racism. The gospel is the answer to humanity being condemned in it’s sins. No problem there. The issue is when people the gospel is the solution to: 1) racism; 2) addiction; 3) financial trouble, etc. The trouble is that there are plenty of non-believers who have: 1) not been racist; 2) beaten addiction; 3) gotten out of financial ruin, all the while remaining dyed-in-the-wool heathens. The number of people who have beaten the curse of sin without the gospel remains at zero, and we damage the gospel greatly… Read more »

Nathan James
Member

You must use a different definition of racism or of sin if you don’t think racism is a sin. Perhaps you can explain what you mean?

mys
Guest
mys

Nathan-
You will have to point to where I said racism is not a sin. Having said that…
Where in the Bible does it say it’s a sin?

bdash
Guest
bdash

according to most here
SJW values determine what is sin or not
not the bible…

Malik
Guest
Malik

Actually I think for most it goes Bible then moral conscience

mys
Guest
mys

Bdash-
Sadly, your statement is true with many Christians. We see this when believers say that “compassion and love” are needed for: 1) gays’ 2) women who have had abortions 3) etc. But no one wants to love racist whites. Who thinks racism is the worst sin on earth? That’s right, godless liberals. And many Christians are following.

Malik
Guest
Malik

They definitely need compassion and love, is your view that we should hate on them? We are called to love and minister to people who live in sin, you don’t have to agree with them to love them.

mys
Guest
mys

Malik-
A few things. 1) the compassion and love given to gays and the others I mentioned is typically a pre-cursor, or code word, for acceptance. 2) I have never seen that offered for white racists. Instead, they are just condemned. They are not even condemned and then offered compassion, just condemned.
I have even read some say that a racist couldn’t really be a Christian. Well, time to kick some folks out of heaven, then, including nearly every European pre-1900

JDF
Guest
JDF

You don’t have to be a Christian to apply Christian principles to things like addiction and finances, and achieve the results of good decisions. You can be respected as an honest person through practicing honesty, and be a non-believer, but honesty is a Christian principle. The Gospel is the answer to all of mankind’s behavioral problems, if simply adhered to.

Jane
Member

The point is that not being racist, beaten addiction, or getting out of financial trouble without the gospel is not actually a victory over those things. It’s probably just a shift to something else equally, though perhaps more subtly, enslaving. If you actually want to cure anything, you need the gospel. And by gospel, what is meant here is not “Biblical advice list of things to do to make life better in some way.” It means the message of redemption and the gift of true eternal life that is the only true victory over anything negative that ever has been… Read more »

mys
Guest
mys

Jane- In a way we totally agree. The gospel is the cure for the effect, or penalty, of sin. It doesn’t make it go away in this life. Oddly, you said that most unbelievers who beat addiction get enslaved to something else, yet, I have seen Christians remain enslaved to addiction. What’s the deal there? The deal is that they are still on earth, and will not beat sin fully until the end of this life. Tl;dr to my first: Saying that the gospel is the cure for racism is just trying to pander to libs, which, as we can… Read more »

Jane
Member

That the gospel is the cure something does not mean that every Christian will automatically be completely free of it in this life. But the gospel does not only cure the penalty of sin; that is a short-sighted and unbiblical view. It makes nonsense of the pastoral advice of the New Testament, which does not simply deal with not going to Hell, but with applying the gospel to the Christian life as a means of working it out. And no, it is not trying to pander to anyone. It is the truth. If the gospel is not the cure for… Read more »

mys
Guest
mys

So the gospel will help fix my leaky roof, do my taxes within the confines of the tax code and cure my common cold?

Jane
Member

Yes, in the sense that the gospel is the only reason there is a solution for any of those things, or that they don’t always result in the worst possible outcome leading to your death. It is only because the world is being reconciled to God through the blood of Christ that anything can possibly work out well for you, taste good, or in any way be positive in your life.

mys
Guest
mys

According to what you are saying Jane, sure, because the minute any of us sin, in fact, before we sin, we are guilty of judgement by a holy God. The fact that I am able to live, and then do my taxes, is an outpouring of God’s grace which I do not deserve. However, people do not merely mean that about racism. They are using the phrase, “gospel is only solution to racism,” to try to appear “relevant” and “with it” and maybe accidentally trick a BLM supporter that they are down with the racial conversation. My replies would be:… Read more »