Resurrection Practice

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“At thy right hand there are pleasures for evermore” (Ps. 16: 11)

The Basket Case Chronicles #193

For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality. So when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal shall have put on immortality, then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory. O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory?” (1 Cor. 15:53–55).

As he leans toward the resurrection, Paul uses the language of “putting on.” In fact, he uses the same verb (endyo) that he uses elsewhere when telling the saints to put on Christ (Rom. 13:14; Gal. 3:27). And all of this “putting on” amounts to the same thing. Putting on Christ is the same thing as putting on incorruption and immortality. And so it is that the daily acts of sanctification, the decisions to put on Christ, are all resurrection practice.

Life smothers death. The corrupt has non-corruption put over top of it. The mortal, that which dies, it buried under that which cannot die. And when this all happens, the promise given in Isaiah and Hosea will come to fruition. Isaiah states bluntly that death is swallowed up in victory (Is.25:8). Hosea taunts both death and the grave (Hos. 13:4).

While from the first day of creation, prior to any sin or rebellion on the part of man, there were always mechanisms for translation and transition to a higher order and glory—as can be seen in the creation of Eve. Adam was put into a deep sleep, and the first bloodshed occurred when a rib was taken from Adam’s side. But all of this was glorious, and was attended by no corruption at all. In this sense we may say that death is the everlasting enemy, and it will be an enemy that the approaching life intends to digest fully.

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timothy
timothy
7 years ago

Hoses taunts both death and the grave (Hos. 13:4).

Did Moses had a brother named Hoses ?

Gianni
Gianni
7 years ago
Reply to  Douglas Wilson

No, one would suppose erroneously. A mose may well be a mose, but a hose is always a hose. And what about their mom’s toes?

Jane Dunsworth
Jane Dunsworth
7 years ago
Reply to  Gianni

But Moses he knowses his toeses aren’t hoses as Hoses supposes that Moses he sees.

Gianni
Gianni
7 years ago
Reply to  Jane Dunsworth

Good point. It couldn’t be a lilly: it’s got to be a rose ’cause it rhymes with Hose.

So Wilson might be onto something, after all.

Mike Bull
7 years ago

‘Putting on’ begins at baptism (Gal. 3:27) because baptism is a voluntary submission and investiture like a knighthood. Baptism is a robe of authority, the white robe of the martyr, the legal witness. Ain’t no babies in Eden, and ain’t no babies in the resurrection. Babies can’t dress themselves. Baptism is about Adam and Eve no longer being naked, but robed with authority as righteous judges, regent and co-regent. Baptism is not about salvation. It is about resurrection. It is not the Gospel, but for those who have responded to the Gospel. The Covenant is objective, but everyone on earth… Read more »